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Monoclonal antibodies could hold promise in asthma treatment and prevention if the results bear out in clinical trials for efficacy, the nation's leading infectious diseases expert told MedPage Today."There's a lot of activity and it's a highly concentrated, highly specific, direct antiviral who can buy ventolin online approach to a number of diseases. The success in Ebola was very encouraging," said National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Director Anthony Fauci, MD.Most recently who can buy ventolin online thrust into the spotlight as effective treatments for Ebola, monoclonal antibodies are currently being researched as a potential treatment for HIV, as well as asthma treatment. This month, the NIH highlighted trials of monoclonal antibodies being conducted among several different asthma treatment patient populations.

Outpatients with asthma treatment, patients hospitalized with the disease, and even a trial in household contacts of confirmed cases, where the therapy was used as prophylaxis.Fauci explained how the mechanism of monoclonal antibodies who can buy ventolin online "is really one of a direct antiviral.""It's like getting a neutralizing antibody that's highly, highly concentrated and highly, highly specific. So, the mechanism involved is blocking of the ventolin from essentially entering its target cell in the body and essentially interrupting the course of ," he said.While Fauci noted the success of monoclonal antibodies to treat Ebola, he added that they are not practical for other ventolines that only last a day or two, where the ventolin may already be cleared once the patient receives the treatment."If you have a disease that's serious enough and prolonged enough, such as what we saw with Ebola, and what we are currently seeing with asthma treatment, then you have enough opportunities to get the monoclonal antibody to actually work," he added.Monoclonal antibodies are currently being administered intravenously, though Fauci said if the treatment works, "you try to get it to a form where you can give it subcutaneously or intramuscularly," a much more convenient way of administering the therapy.He also explained the difference between monoclonal antibodies and convalescent plasma, describing them as "extremely pure," due to their homogeneous nature. Therefore the recent published side effects seen in trials of convalescent plasma in asthma treatment patients may not apply."The difference between monoclonal antibodies and convalescent plasma is plasma has a lot of other things in it, which who can buy ventolin online could lead to allergic and other reactions," Fauci said.

"Theoretically, there are more complex factors in plasma than there are with a monoclonal antibody."Ultimately, when asked if one who can buy ventolin online of his patients asked him about monoclonal antibodies, Fauci said he would say they are a "promising form of therapy.""Many of them are still in clinical trials and not available for routine use, but the data that has accumulated recently indicates they are a very promising form of prevention and treatment," he noted. Molly Walker is an associate editor, who covers infectious diseases for MedPage Today. She has who can buy ventolin online a passion for evidence, data and public health.

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A broadly ventolin max dose neutralising antibody to prevent HIV transmissionTwo HIV prevention trials (HVTN 704/HPTN 085 over at this website. HVTN 703/HPTN 081) enrolled 2699 at-risk cisgender men and transgender persons in the Americas and Europe and 1924 at-risk women in sub-Saharan Africa who were randomly assigned to receive the broadly neutralising antibody (bnAb) VRC01 or placebo (10 infusions at an interval of 8 weeks). Moderate-to-severe adverse events related ventolin max dose to VRC01 were uncommon. In a prespecified pooled analysis, over 20 months, VRC01 offered an estimated prevention efficacy of ~75% against VRC01-sensitive isolates (30% of ventolines circulating in the trial regions).

However, VRC01 did not prevent ventolin max dose with other HIV isolates and overall HIV acquisition compared with placebo. The data provide proof of concept that bnAb can prevent HIV acquisition, although the approach is limited by viral diversity and potential selection of resistant isolates.Corey L, Gilbert PB, Juraska M, et al. Two randomized trials of neutralizing ventolin max dose antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. N Engl J Med.

2021;384:1003–1014.Seminal cytokine profiles are associated with the risk of HIV transmissionInvestigators analysed a panel of 34 cytokines/chemokines in blood and ventolin max dose semen of men (predominantly men who have sex with men) with HIV, comparing 21 who transmitted HIV to their partners and 22 who did not. Overall, 47% of men had a recent HIV , 19% were on antiretroviral therapy and 84% were viraemic. The cytokine ventolin max dose profile in seminal fluid, but not in blood, differed significantly between transmitters and non-transmitters, with transmitters showing higher seminal concentrations of interleukin 13 (IL-13), IL-15 and IL-33, and lower concentrations of interferon‐gamma, IL-15, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), IL-17, granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF), IL-4, IL-16 and eotaxin. Although limited, the findings suggest that the seminal milieu modulates the risk of HIV transmission, providing a potential development opportunity for HIV prevention strategies.Vanpouille C, Frick A, Rawlings SA, et al.

Cytokine network ventolin max dose and sexual HIV transmission in men who have sex with men. Clin Infect Dis. 2020;71:2655–2662.The challenge of estimating global treatment eligibility for chronic hepatitis B from incomplete datasetsWorldwide, over 250 million people are estimated to ventolin max dose live with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), although only ~11% is diagnosed and a minority receives antiviral therapy. An estimate of the global proportion eligible for treatment was not previously available.

A systematic review analysed studies of CHB populations done between 2007 and 2018 to estimate the prevalence of cirrhosis, abnormal alanine aminotransferase, hepatitis B ventolin ventolin max dose DNA >2000 or >20 000 IU/mL, hepatitis B e-antigen, and overall eligibility for treatment as per WHO and other guidelines. The pooled treatment eligibility estimate was 19% (95% CI 18% to 20%), with about 10% requiring urgent treatment due to cirrhosis. However, the estimate should be interpreted with ventolin max dose caution due to incomplete data acquisition and reporting in available studies. Standardised reporting is needed to improve global and regional estimates of CHB treatment eligibility and guide effective policy formulation.Tan M, Bhadoria AS, Cui F, et al.

Estimating the proportion of people with chronic hepatitis ventolin max dose B ventolin eligible for hepatitis B antiviral treatment worldwide. A systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet Gastroenterol ventolin max dose Hepatol, 2021. 6:106–119.Broad geographical disparity in the contribution of HIV to the burden of cervical cancerThis systematic review and meta-analysis estimated the contribution of HIV to the global and regional burden of cervical cancer using data from 24 studies which included 236 127 women with HIV.

HIV ventolin max dose markedly increased the risk of cervical cancer (pooled relative risk 6.07. 95% CI 4.40 to 8.37). In 2018, 4.9% (95% CI 3.6% to 6.4%) of cervical cancers were attributable to HIV globally, although the population-attributable fraction for HIV varied geographically, reaching 21% (95% CI 15.6% to 26.8%) ventolin max dose in the African region. Cervical cancer is preventable and treatable.

Efforts are needed to expand access to HPV vaccination in ventolin max dose sub-Saharan Africa. More immediately, there is an urgent need to integrate cervical cancer screening within HIV services.Stelzle D, Tanaka LF, Lee KK, et al. Estimates of the global burden of cervical cancer associated with ventolin max dose HIV. Lancet Glob Health.

2020. 9:e161–69.The complex relationship between serum vitamin D and persistence of high-risk human papilloma ventolin Most cervical high-risk human papilloma ventolin (hrHPV) s are transient and those that persist are more likely to progress to cancer. Based on the proposed immunomodulatory properties of vitamin D, a longitudinal study examined the association between serum concentrations of five vitamin D biomarkers and short-term persistent (vs transient or sporadic) detection of hrHPV in 72 women who collected monthly cervicovaginal swabs over 6 months. No significant associations were detected in the primary analysis.

In sensitivity analyses, after multiple adjustments, serum concentrations of multiple vitamin D biomarkers were positively associated with the short-term persistence of 14 selected hrHPV types. The relationship between vitamin D and hrHPV warrants closer examination. Studies should have longer follow-up, include populations with more diverse vitamin D concentrations and account for vitamin D supplementation.Troja C, Hoofnagle AN, Szpiro A, et al. Understanding the role of emerging vitamin D biomarkers on short-term persistence of high-risk HPV among mid-adult women.

J Infect Dis 2020. Online ahead of printPublished in STI—the editor’s choice. One in five cases of with Neisseria gonorrhoeae clear spontaneouslyStudies have indicated that Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) s can resolve spontaneously without antibiotic therapy. A substudy of a randomised trial investigated 405 untreated subjects (71% men) who underwent both pretrial and enrolment NG testing at the same anatomical site (genital, pharyngeal and rectal).

Based on nuclear acid amplification tests, 83 subjects (20.5%) showed clearance of the anatomical site within a median of 10 days (IQR 7–15) between tests. Those with spontaneous clearance were less likely to have concurrent chlamydia (p=0.029) and dysuria (p=0.035), but there were no differences in age, gender, sexual orientation, HIV status, number of previous NG episodes, and symptoms other than dysuria between those with and without clearance. Given the high rate of spontaneous resolution, point-of-care NG testing should be considered to reduce unnecessary antibiotic treatment.Mensforth S, Ayinde OC, Ross J. Spontaneous clearance of genital and extragenital Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

Data from GToG. STI 2020. 96:556–561.BackgroundReproductive aged women are at risk of both pregnancy and sexually transmitted s (STI). The modern contraceptive prevalence among married and unmarried women in South Africa is 54% and 64%, respectively, with injectable progestins being most widely used.1 Moreover, current global efforts aim towards all women having access to a range of reliable contraceptives options.2 The prevalences of chlamydia and gonorrhoea are high among women in Africa, particularly among younger women.

A recent meta-analysis of over 37 000 women estimated prevalences for chlamydia and gonorrhoea by region and population type (South Africa clinic/community-based, Eastern Africa higher-risk and Southern/Eastern Africa clinic community-based). High chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences were found among 15–24 year-old South African women and high risk populations in East Africa.3 Both chlamydia and gonorrhoea are associated with numerous comorbidities including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), ectopic pregnancy, infertility, increased risk of HIV and other STIs, as well as significant social harm.4While STIs are a significant global health burden, data on STI prevalence by gender and drivers of are limited, hindering an effective public health response.5 Moreover, data on the association between contraceptive use and risk of non-HIV STIs are limited. The WHO recently reported stagnation in efforts to decrease global STI incidence.5 Understanding drivers of STI acquisition, including any possible associations with widely used contraceptive methods, is necessary to effectively target public health responses that reduce STI incidence and associated comorbidities.The ECHO Trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier. NCT02550067) was a multicentre, open-label randomised trial of 7829 HIV-seronegative women seeking effective contraception in Eswatini, Kenya, South Africa and Zambia.

Detailed trial methods and results have been published.6 7 We conducted a secondary analysis of ECHO trial data to evaluate absolute and relative chlamydia and gonorrhoea final visit prevalences among women randomised to intramuscular depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA-IM), a copper intrauterine device (IUD) and a levonorgestrel (LNG) implant.MethodsStudy design, participants and ethicsWomen were enrolled in the ECHO trial from December 2015 through September 2017. Institutional review boards at each site approved the study protocol and women provided written informed consent before any study procedures. In brief, women who were not pregnant, HIV-seronegative, aged 16–35 years, seeking effective contraception, without medical contraindications, willing to use the assigned method for 18 months, reported not using injectable, intrauterine or implantable contraception for the previous 6 months and reported being sexually active, were enrolled. At every visit, participants received HIV risk reduction counselling, HIV testing and STI management, condoms and, as it became a part of national standard of care, HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis.

Counselling messages related to HIV risk were implemented consistently across the three groups throughout the trial.6The trial was implemented in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and Good Clinical Practice. Informed consent was obtained from participants or their parents/guardians and human experimentation guidelines of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and those of the authors' institution(s) were followed.Contraceptive exposureAt enrolment, women were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to DMPA-IM, copper IUD or LNG implant.6 Participants received an injection of 150 mg/mL DMPA-IM (Depo Provera. Pfizer, Puurs, Belgium) at enrolment and every 3 months until the final visit at 18 months after enrolment, a copper IUD (Optima TCu380A. Injeflex, Sao Paolo, Brazil) or a LNG implant (Jadelle.

Bayer, Turku, Finland) at enrolment. Women returned for follow-up visits at 1 month after enrolment to address initial contraceptive side-effects and every 3 months thereafter, for up to 18 months with later enrolling participants contributing 12 to 18 months of follow-up. Visits included HIV serological testing, contraceptive counselling, syndromic STI management and safety monitoring.STI outcomesThe primary outcomes of this secondary analysis were prevalent chlamydia and gonorrhoea at the final visit. Syndromic STI management was provided at screening and all follow-up visits.

Nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae was conducted at screening and final visits, at the visit of HIV detection for participants who became HIV infected and at clinical discretion. Any untreated participants with positive NAAT results were contacted to return to the study clinic for treatment.CovariatesAt baseline (inclusive of screening and enrolment visits), we collected demographic, sexual and reproductive risk behaviour and reproductive and contraceptive history data. Baseline risk factors evaluated as covariates included age, whether the participant earned her own income, chlamydia and gonorrhoea status, herpes simplex ventolin type 2 (HSV-2) sero-status and suspected PID. Final visit factors evaluated as covariates included number of sex partners in the past 3 months, number of new sex partners in the past 3 months, HIV serostatus, HSV-2 serostatus, condom use in the past 3 months, sex exchanged for money/gifts, sex during vaginal bleeding, follow-up time and number of pelvic examinations during follow-up.

Age and HSV-2 serostatus were evaluated for effect measure modification.Statistical analysisWe conducted analyses using R V.3.5.3 (Vienna, Austria), and log-binomial regression to estimate chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences within each contraceptive group and pairwise prevalence ratios (PR) between each arm in as-randomised and consistent use analyses.In the as-randomised analysis, we analysed participants by the contraceptive method assigned at randomisation independent of method adherence. We estimated crude point prevalences by arm and study site and pairwise adjusted PRs.In the consistent use analysis, we only included women who initiated use of their randomised contraceptive method and maintained randomised method adherence throughout follow-up. We estimated crude point prevalences by arm and pairwise adjusted PRs, with evaluation of age and HSV-2 status first as potential effect measure modifiers, and all covariates above as potential confounders. Study site and age were retained in the final model.

Other covariates were retained if their inclusion in the base model led to a 10% change in the effect estimate through backwards selection.Supplementary analysesAdditional supporting analyses to assess postrandomisation potential sources of bias were conducted to inform interpretation of results. These include evaluation of recent sexual behaviour at enrolment, month 9 and the final visit. Cohort participation (ie, follow-up time, early discontinuation and timing of randomised method discontinuation) and health outcomes (ie, final visit HIV and HSV-2 status) and frequency and results of pelvic examinations by STI status, site and visit month by randomised arm.ResultsA total of 7829 women were randomly assigned as follows. 2609 to the DMPA-IM group, 2607 to the copper IUD group and 2613 to the LNG implant group (figure 1).

Participants were excluded if they were HIV positive at enrolment, did not have at least one HIV test or did not have chlamydia and gonorrhoea test results at the final visit. Overall, 90%, 94% and 93% from the DMPA-IM, copper IUD and LNG implant groups, respectively, were included in analyses.Study profile. DMPA-IM, depot medroxy progesterone acetate. IUD, intrauterine device.

LNG, levonorgestrel." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 1 Study profile. DMPA-IM, depot medroxy progesterone acetate. IUD, intrauterine device. LNG, levonorgestrel.Participant characteristicsBaseline characteristics were similar across groups (table 1).

Nearly two-third of enrolled women (63%) were aged 24 and younger and 5768 (74%) of the study population resided in South Africa.View this table:Table 1 Participant baseline and final visit characteristicsThe duration of participation averaged 16 months with no differences between randomised groups (table 1). A total of 1468 (19%) women either did not receive their randomised method or discontinued use during follow-up. Overall method continuation rates were high with minimal differences between randomised groups when measured by person-years.6 The proportion, however, of method non-adherence as defined in this analysis (ie, did not receive randomised method at baseline or discontinued randomised method at any point during follow-up), was greater in the DMPA-IM group (26%), followed by the copper IUD (18%) and LNG implant (12%) groups. Timing of discontinuation also differed across methods.

During the first 6 months, method discontinuation was highest in the copper IUD group (7%) followed closely by DMPA-IM (6%) and LNG implant (4%) groups. Between 7 and 12 months of follow-up, it was highest in DMPA-IM group (15%), with equivalent proportions in the LNG implant (5%) and copper IUD (5%) groups.Point prevalences of chlamydia and gonorrhoea at baseline and final visitsIn total, 18% of women had chlamydia at baseline (figure 2A) and 15% at the final visit. Among women 24 years and younger, 22% and 20% had chlamydia at baseline and final visits, respectively. Women aged 25–35 at baseline were less likely to have chlamydia at both baseline (12%) and final visits (8%) compared with younger women.

Baseline chlamydia prevalence ranged from 5% in Zambia to 28% in the Western Cape, South Africa (figure 2B).Point prevalence (per 100 persons) of chlamydia and gonorrhoea at baseline and final visit by age category and study site region. Y-axis scale differs for chlamydia and gonorrhoea figures." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 2 Point prevalence (per 100 persons) of chlamydia and gonorrhoea at baseline and final visit by age category and study site region. Y-axis scale differs for chlamydia and gonorrhoea figures.Among all women, 5% had gonorrhoea at baseline and the final visit (figure 2C). Women aged 24 and younger were more likely to have gonorrhoea compared with women aged 25 and older at both baseline (5% vs 4%, respectively) and the final visit (6% vs 3%, respectively).

Baseline gonorrhoea prevalence ranged from 3% in Zambia and Kenya to 9% in the Western Cape, South Africa (figure 2D). Similar prevalences were observed at the final visit.Point prevalences of chlamydia and gonorrhoea at final visit by randomised contraceptive methodFourteen per cent of women randomised to DMPA-IM, 15% to copper IUD and 17% to LNG implant had chlamydia at the final visit (table 2).View this table:Table 2 Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae prevalence at final visitThe prevalence of chlamydia did not significantly differ between DMPA-IM and copper IUD groups (PR 0.90, 95% CI (0.79 to 1.04)) or between copper IUD and LNG implant groups (PR 0.92, 95% CI (0.81 to 1.04)). Women in the DMPA-IM group, however, had a significantly lower risk of chlamydia compared with the LNG implant group (PR. 0.83, 95% CI (0.72 to 0.95)).

Findings from the consistent use analysis were similar, and neither age nor HSV-2 status modified the observed associations.Four per cent of women randomised to DMPA-IM, 6% to copper IUD and 5% to LNG implant had gonorrhoea at the final visit (table 2). Gonorrhoea prevalence did not significantly differ between DMPA-IM and LNG implant groups (PR. 0.79, 95% CI (0.61 to 1.03)) or between copper IUD and LNG implant groups (PR. 1.18, 95% CI (0.93 to 1.49)).

Women in the DMPA-IM group had a significantly lower risk of gonorrhoea compared with women in the copper IUD group (PR. 0.67, 95% CI (0.52 to 0.87)). Results from as randomised and continuous use analyses did not differ. And again, neither age nor HSV-2 status modified the observed associations.Clinical assessment by randomised contraceptive methodTo assess the potential for outcome ascertainment bias, we evaluated the frequency of pelvic examinations and abdominal/pelvic pain and discharge by study arm.

Women in the copper IUD group were generally more likely to receive a pelvic examination during follow-up as compared with women in the DMPA-IM and LNG implant groups (online supplemental appendix 1). Similarly, abdominal/pelvic pain on examination or abnormal discharge was observed most frequently in the copper IUD group. The number of pelvic examinations met the prespecified criteria for retention in the adjusted gonorrhoea model but not in the chlamydia model.Supplemental materialFrequency of syndromic symptoms and potential reAmong women who had chlamydia at baseline, 23% were also positive at the final visit (online supplemental appendix 2, figure 3A). Nine per cent of gonorrhoea-positive women at baseline were also positive at the final visit (online supplemental appendix 2, figure 3B).

Across both baseline and final visits, a minority of women with chlamydia or gonorrhoea presented with signs and/or symptoms. Among chlamydia-positive women, only 12% presented with either abnormal vaginal discharge and/or abdominal/pelvic pain at their test-positive visit (online supplemental appendix 2, figure 3C). Similarly, only 15% of gonorrhoea-positive women presented with abnormal vaginal discharge and/or abdominal/pelvic pain at their test-positive visit (online supplemental appendix 2, figure 3D).Potential re and symptoms among women with chlamydia or gonorrhoea. Data are pooled across the screening and final visits in figures (C) and (D).

Symptomatic is defined as presenting with abnormal vaginal discharge and/or abdominal/pelvic pain. Final visit is described as potential re because test of cure was not conducted following baseline diagnosis and treatment." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 3 Potential re and symptoms among women with chlamydia or gonorrhoea. Data are pooled across the screening and final visits in figures (C) and (D). Symptomatic is defined as presenting with abnormal vaginal discharge and/or abdominal/pelvic pain.

Final visit is described as potential re because test of cure was not conducted following baseline diagnosis and treatment.DiscussionWe observed differences in final prevalences of chlamydia and gonorrhoea by contraceptive group in both as-randomised and consistent-use analyses. The DMPA-IM group had lower final visit chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences as compared with copper IUD and LNG implant groups, though only the DMPA-IM versus the copper IUD comparison of gonorrhoea and DMPA-IM versus LNG implant comparison of chlamydia reached statistical significance. These are novel findings that have not previously been reported to our knowledge and were determined in a randomised trial setting with high participant retention, robust biomarker testing and high randomised method adherence. Interestingly, the copper IUD group had higher gonorrhoea and lower chlamydia prevalence compared with the LNG implant group, though neither finding was statistically significant.Two recent systematic reviews of the association between contraceptives and STIs found inconsistent and insufficient evidence on the association between the contraceptive methods under study in ECHO and chlamydia and gonorrhoea.8 9 Neither systematic review identified any randomised studies or any direct comparative evidence for DMPA-IM, copper IUD and LNG implant, thus enabling a unique scientific contribution from this secondary trial analysis.

Nonetheless, these findings should be interpreted in light of biological plausibility, as well as the design strengths and limitations of this analysis.The emerging science on the biological mechanisms underlying HIV susceptibility demonstrates the complex relationship between the infectious pathogen, the host innate and adaptive immune response and the interaction of both with the vaginal microbiome and other -omes. Data on these factors in relationship to chlamydia and gonorrhoea acquisition are much more limited but can be assumed to be equally complex. Vaginal microbiome composition, including microbial metabolic by-products, have been shown to significantly modify risk of HIV acquisition and to vary with exogenous hormone exposure, menstrual cycle phase, ethnicity and geography.10–12 These same biological principles likely apply to chlamydia and gonorrhoea susceptibility. While DMPA-IM has been associated with decreased bacterial vaginosis (BV), initiation of the copper IUD has been associated with increased BV prevalence, and BV is associated with chlamydia and gonorrhoea acquisition.13 14 Moreover, Lactobacillus crispatus, which is less abundant in BV, has been shown to inhibit HeLa cell by Chlamydia trachomatis and inhibits growth of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in animal models.15 16 In addition, microbial community state types that are deficient in Lactobacillus crispatus and/or dominated by dysbiotic species are associated with inflammation, which is a driver of both STI and HIV susceptibility.

Thus, while the exact mechanisms of chlamydia and gonorrhoea in the presence of exogenous hormones and varying host microbiomes are unknown, it is biologically plausible that these complex factors may result in differential susceptibility to chlamydia and gonorrhoea among DMPA-IM, copper IUD and LNG implant users.An alternative explanation for these findings may be postrandomisation differences in clinical care and/or sexual behaviour. Participants in the copper IUD arm were more likely to have pelvic examinations and more likely to have discharge compared with women in the DMPA-IM and LNG implant groups. While interim STI testing and/or treatment were not documented, women in the copper IUD arm may have been more likely to receive syndromic STI treatment during follow-up due to more examination and observed discharge. More frequent STI treatment in the copper IUD group would theoretically lower the final visit point prevalence relative to women in the DMPA-IM and LNG implant arms, suggesting that the observed lower risk of STI in the DMPA-IM arm is not due to differential examination, testing and treatment.

Differential sexual risk behaviour may also have influenced the results. As reported previously, women in the DMPA-IM group less frequently reported condomless sex and multiple partners than women in the other groups, and both DMPA-IM and LNG implant users less frequently reported new partners and sex during menses than copper IUD users.6 Statistical control of self-reported sexual risk behaviour in the consistent-use analysis may have been inadequate if self-reported sexual behaviour was inaccurately or insufficiently reported.A second alternative explanation may be differences in randomised method non-adherence, which was greater in the DMPA-IM group, compared with copper IUD and LNG implant groups. Yet, the consistency of findings in the as-randomised and continuous use analyses suggests that method non-adherence had minimal effect on study outcomes. Taken as a whole, these findings indicate that there may be real differences in chlamydia and gonorrhoea risk associated with use of DMPA-IM, the copper IUD and LNG implant.

However, any true differential risk by method must be evaluated in light of the holistic benefits and risks of each method.The high observed chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences, despite intensive counselling and condom provision, warrants attention, particularly among women ages 24 years and younger and among women in South Africa and Eswatini. While the ECHO study was conducted in settings of high HIV/STI incidence, enrolment criteria did not purposefully target women at highest risk of HIV/STI in the trial communities, suggesting that the observed prevalences may be broadly applicable to women seeking effective contraception in those settings. Improved approaches are needed to prevent STIs, including options for expedited partner treatment, to prevent re.As expected, few women testing positive for chlamydia or gonorrhoea presented with symptoms (12% and 15%, respectively), and a substantial proportion of women who were positive and treated at baseline were infected at the final visit despite syndromic management during the follow-up. Given that syndromic management is the standard of care within primary health facilities in most trial settings, these data suggest that a large proportion of among reproductive aged women is missed, exacerbating the burden of curable STIs and associated morbidities.

Routine access to more reliable diagnostics, like NAAT and novel point-of-care diagnostic tests, will be key to managing asymptomatic STIs and reducing STI prevalence and related morbidities in these settings.17This secondary analysis of the ECHO trial has strengths and limitations. Strengths include the randomised design with comparator groups of equal STI baseline risk. Participants had high adherence to their randomised contraceptive method.6 While all participants received standardised clinical care and counselling, the unblinded randomisation may have allowed postrandomisation differences in STI risk over time by method. It is possible that participants modified their risk-taking behaviour based on study counselling messages regarding the potential association between DMPA-IM and HIV.In conclusion, our analyses suggest that DMPA-IM users may have lower risk of chlamydia and gonorrhoea compared with LNG implant and copper IUD users, respectively.

Further investigation is warranted to better understand the mechanisms of chlamydia and gonorrhoea susceptibility in the context of contraceptive use. Moreover, the high chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences in this population, independent of contraceptive method, warrants urgent attention.Key messagesThe prevalence of chlamydia and gonorrhoea varied by contraceptive method in this randomised trial.High chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences, despite intensive counselling and condom provision, warrants attention, particularly among young women in South Africa and Eswatini.Most chlamydia and gonorrhoea s were asymptomatic. Therefore, routine access to reliable diagnostics are needed to effectively manage and prevent STIs in African women..

A broadly who can buy ventolin online neutralising antibody https://www.anitapt.com/buy-cheap-kamagra-jelly-online-uk/ to prevent HIV transmissionTwo HIV prevention trials (HVTN 704/HPTN 085. HVTN 703/HPTN 081) enrolled 2699 at-risk cisgender men and transgender persons in the Americas and Europe and 1924 at-risk women in sub-Saharan Africa who were randomly assigned to receive the broadly neutralising antibody (bnAb) VRC01 or placebo (10 infusions at an interval of 8 weeks). Moderate-to-severe adverse events related to who can buy ventolin online VRC01 were uncommon. In a prespecified pooled analysis, over 20 months, VRC01 offered an estimated prevention efficacy of ~75% against VRC01-sensitive isolates (30% of ventolines circulating in the trial regions).

However, VRC01 did not prevent who can buy ventolin online with other HIV isolates and overall HIV acquisition compared with placebo. The data provide proof of concept that bnAb can prevent HIV acquisition, although the approach is limited by viral diversity and potential selection of resistant isolates.Corey L, Gilbert PB, Juraska M, et al. Two randomized who can buy ventolin online trials of neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. N Engl J Med.

2021;384:1003–1014.Seminal cytokine profiles are associated with who can buy ventolin online the risk of HIV transmissionInvestigators analysed a panel of 34 cytokines/chemokines in blood and semen of men (predominantly men who have sex with men) with HIV, comparing 21 who transmitted HIV to their partners and 22 who did not. Overall, 47% of men had a recent HIV , 19% were on antiretroviral therapy and 84% were viraemic. The cytokine profile in seminal fluid, but not in blood, differed significantly between transmitters and non-transmitters, with transmitters showing higher seminal concentrations of interleukin 13 (IL-13), IL-15 and IL-33, and lower concentrations of interferon‐gamma, IL-15, macrophage colony-stimulating who can buy ventolin online factor (M-CSF), IL-17, granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF), IL-4, IL-16 and eotaxin. Although limited, the findings suggest that the seminal milieu modulates the risk of HIV transmission, providing a potential development opportunity for HIV prevention strategies.Vanpouille C, Frick A, Rawlings SA, et al.

Cytokine network and sexual HIV transmission in men who who can buy ventolin online have sex with men. Clin Infect Dis. 2020;71:2655–2662.The challenge of estimating global treatment eligibility for chronic hepatitis B from incomplete datasetsWorldwide, over 250 million people are estimated to live with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), although only ~11% is who can buy ventolin online diagnosed and a minority receives antiviral therapy. An estimate of the global proportion eligible for treatment was not previously available.

A systematic review analysed studies of CHB populations done between 2007 and 2018 to estimate the prevalence of cirrhosis, abnormal alanine aminotransferase, hepatitis B ventolin DNA >2000 or >20 000 IU/mL, hepatitis B e-antigen, and who can buy ventolin online overall eligibility for treatment as per WHO and other guidelines. The pooled treatment eligibility estimate was 19% (95% CI 18% to 20%), with about 10% requiring urgent treatment due to cirrhosis. However, the estimate should be interpreted with caution due to incomplete data who can buy ventolin online acquisition and reporting in available studies. Standardised reporting is needed to improve global and regional estimates of CHB treatment eligibility and guide effective policy formulation.Tan M, Bhadoria AS, Cui F, et al.

Estimating the proportion of people with chronic hepatitis B ventolin eligible for hepatitis B antiviral treatment who can buy ventolin online worldwide. A systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet Gastroenterol who can buy ventolin online Hepatol, 2021. 6:106–119.Broad geographical disparity in the contribution of HIV to the burden of cervical cancerThis systematic review and meta-analysis estimated the contribution of HIV to the global and regional burden of cervical cancer using data from 24 studies which included 236 127 women with HIV.

HIV markedly increased the risk of cervical cancer (pooled who can buy ventolin online relative risk 6.07. 95% CI 4.40 to 8.37). In 2018, 4.9% (95% CI 3.6% to 6.4%) of cervical cancers were attributable to HIV globally, although the population-attributable fraction for HIV varied geographically, reaching who can buy ventolin online 21% (95% CI 15.6% to 26.8%) in the African region. Cervical cancer is preventable and treatable.

Efforts are needed to expand access to HPV vaccination in sub-Saharan Africa who can buy ventolin online. More immediately, there is an urgent need to integrate cervical cancer screening within HIV services.Stelzle D, Tanaka LF, Lee KK, et al. Estimates of the who can buy ventolin online global burden of cervical cancer associated with HIV. Lancet Glob Health.

2020. 9:e161–69.The complex relationship between serum vitamin D and persistence of high-risk human papilloma ventolin Most cervical high-risk human papilloma ventolin (hrHPV) s are transient and those that persist are more likely to progress to cancer. Based on the proposed immunomodulatory properties of vitamin D, a longitudinal study examined the association between serum concentrations of five vitamin D biomarkers and short-term persistent (vs transient or sporadic) detection of hrHPV in 72 women who collected monthly cervicovaginal swabs over 6 months. No significant associations were detected in the primary analysis.

In sensitivity analyses, after multiple adjustments, serum concentrations of multiple vitamin D biomarkers were positively associated with the short-term persistence of 14 selected hrHPV types. The relationship between vitamin D and hrHPV warrants closer examination. Studies should have longer follow-up, include populations with more diverse vitamin D concentrations and account for vitamin D supplementation.Troja C, Hoofnagle AN, Szpiro A, et al. Understanding the role of emerging vitamin D biomarkers on short-term persistence of high-risk HPV among mid-adult women.

J Infect Dis 2020. Online ahead of printPublished in STI—the editor’s choice. One in five cases of with Neisseria gonorrhoeae clear spontaneouslyStudies have indicated that Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) s can resolve spontaneously without antibiotic therapy. A substudy of a randomised trial investigated 405 untreated subjects (71% men) who underwent both pretrial and enrolment NG testing at the same anatomical site (genital, pharyngeal and rectal).

Based on nuclear acid amplification tests, 83 subjects (20.5%) showed clearance of the anatomical site within a median of 10 days (IQR 7–15) between tests. Those with spontaneous clearance were less likely to have concurrent chlamydia (p=0.029) and dysuria (p=0.035), but there were no differences in age, gender, sexual orientation, HIV status, number of previous NG episodes, and symptoms other than dysuria between those with and without clearance. Given the high rate of spontaneous resolution, point-of-care NG testing should be considered to reduce unnecessary antibiotic treatment.Mensforth S, Ayinde OC, Ross J. Spontaneous clearance of genital and extragenital Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

Data from GToG. STI 2020. 96:556–561.BackgroundReproductive aged women are at risk of both pregnancy and sexually transmitted s (STI). The modern contraceptive prevalence among married and unmarried women in South Africa is 54% and 64%, respectively, with injectable progestins being most widely used.1 Moreover, current global efforts aim towards all women having access to a range of reliable contraceptives options.2 The prevalences of chlamydia and gonorrhoea are high among women in Africa, particularly among younger women.

A recent meta-analysis of over 37 000 women estimated prevalences for chlamydia and gonorrhoea by region and population type (South Africa clinic/community-based, Eastern Africa higher-risk and Southern/Eastern Africa clinic community-based). High chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences were found among 15–24 year-old South African women and high risk populations in East Africa.3 Both chlamydia and gonorrhoea are associated with numerous comorbidities including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), ectopic pregnancy, infertility, increased risk of HIV and other STIs, as well as significant social harm.4While STIs are a significant global health burden, data on STI prevalence by gender and drivers of are limited, hindering an effective public health response.5 Moreover, data on the association between contraceptive use and risk of non-HIV STIs are limited. The WHO recently reported stagnation in efforts to decrease global STI incidence.5 Understanding drivers of STI acquisition, including any possible associations with widely used contraceptive methods, is necessary to effectively target public health responses that reduce STI incidence and associated comorbidities.The ECHO Trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier. NCT02550067) was a multicentre, open-label randomised trial of 7829 HIV-seronegative women seeking effective contraception in Eswatini, Kenya, South Africa and Zambia.

Detailed trial methods and results have been published.6 7 We conducted a secondary analysis of ECHO trial data to evaluate absolute and relative chlamydia and gonorrhoea final visit prevalences among women randomised to intramuscular depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA-IM), a copper intrauterine device (IUD) and a levonorgestrel (LNG) implant.MethodsStudy design, participants and ethicsWomen were enrolled in the ECHO trial from December 2015 through September 2017. Institutional review boards at each site approved the study protocol and women provided written informed consent before any study procedures. In brief, women who were not pregnant, HIV-seronegative, aged 16–35 years, seeking effective contraception, without medical contraindications, willing to use the assigned method for 18 months, reported not using injectable, intrauterine or implantable contraception for the previous 6 months and reported being sexually active, were enrolled. At every visit, participants received HIV risk reduction counselling, HIV testing and STI management, condoms and, as it became a part of national standard of care, HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis.

Counselling messages related to HIV risk were implemented consistently across the three groups throughout the trial.6The trial was implemented in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and Good Clinical Practice. Informed consent was obtained from participants or their parents/guardians and human experimentation guidelines of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and those of the authors' institution(s) were followed.Contraceptive exposureAt enrolment, women were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to DMPA-IM, copper IUD or LNG implant.6 Participants received an injection of 150 mg/mL DMPA-IM (Depo Provera. Pfizer, Puurs, Belgium) at enrolment and every 3 months until the final visit at 18 months after enrolment, a copper IUD (Optima TCu380A. Injeflex, Sao Paolo, Brazil) or a LNG implant (Jadelle.

Bayer, Turku, Finland) at enrolment. Women returned for follow-up visits at 1 month after enrolment to address initial contraceptive side-effects and every 3 months thereafter, for up to 18 months with later enrolling participants contributing 12 to 18 months of follow-up. Visits included HIV serological testing, contraceptive counselling, syndromic STI management and safety monitoring.STI outcomesThe primary outcomes of this secondary analysis were prevalent chlamydia and gonorrhoea at the final visit. Syndromic STI management was provided at screening and all follow-up visits.

Nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae was conducted at screening and final visits, at the visit of HIV detection for participants who became HIV infected and at clinical discretion. Any untreated participants with positive NAAT results were contacted to return to the study clinic for treatment.CovariatesAt baseline (inclusive of screening and enrolment visits), we collected demographic, sexual and reproductive risk behaviour and reproductive and contraceptive history data. Baseline risk factors evaluated as covariates included age, whether the participant earned her own income, chlamydia and gonorrhoea status, herpes simplex ventolin type 2 (HSV-2) sero-status and suspected PID. Final visit factors evaluated as covariates included number of sex partners in the past 3 months, number of new sex partners in the past 3 months, HIV serostatus, HSV-2 serostatus, condom use in the past 3 months, sex exchanged for money/gifts, sex during vaginal bleeding, follow-up time and number of pelvic examinations during follow-up.

Age and HSV-2 serostatus were evaluated for effect measure modification.Statistical analysisWe conducted analyses using R V.3.5.3 (Vienna, Austria), and log-binomial regression to estimate chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences within each contraceptive group and pairwise prevalence ratios (PR) between each arm in as-randomised and consistent use analyses.In the as-randomised analysis, we analysed participants by the contraceptive method assigned at randomisation independent of method adherence. We estimated crude point prevalences by arm and study site and pairwise adjusted PRs.In the consistent use analysis, we only included women who initiated use of their randomised contraceptive method and maintained randomised method adherence throughout follow-up. We estimated crude point prevalences by arm and pairwise adjusted PRs, with evaluation of age and HSV-2 status first as potential effect measure modifiers, and all covariates above as potential confounders. Study site and age were retained in the final model.

Other covariates were retained if their inclusion in the base model led to a 10% change in the effect estimate through backwards selection.Supplementary analysesAdditional supporting analyses to assess postrandomisation potential sources of bias were conducted to inform interpretation of results. These include evaluation of recent sexual behaviour at enrolment, month 9 and the final visit. Cohort participation (ie, follow-up time, early discontinuation and timing of randomised method discontinuation) and health outcomes (ie, final visit HIV and HSV-2 status) and frequency and results of pelvic examinations by STI status, site and visit month by randomised arm.ResultsA total of 7829 women were randomly assigned as follows. 2609 to the DMPA-IM group, 2607 to the copper IUD group and 2613 to the LNG implant group (figure 1).

Participants were excluded if they were HIV positive at enrolment, did not have at least one HIV test or did not have chlamydia and gonorrhoea test results at the final visit. Overall, 90%, 94% and 93% from the DMPA-IM, copper IUD and LNG implant groups, respectively, were included in analyses.Study profile. DMPA-IM, depot medroxy progesterone acetate. IUD, intrauterine device.

LNG, levonorgestrel." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 1 Study profile. DMPA-IM, depot medroxy progesterone acetate. IUD, intrauterine device. LNG, levonorgestrel.Participant characteristicsBaseline characteristics were similar across groups (table 1).

Nearly two-third of enrolled women (63%) were aged 24 and younger and 5768 (74%) of the study population resided in South Africa.View this table:Table 1 Participant baseline and final visit characteristicsThe duration of participation averaged 16 months with no differences between randomised groups (table 1). A total of 1468 (19%) women either did not receive their randomised method or discontinued use during follow-up. Overall method continuation rates were high with minimal differences between randomised groups when measured by person-years.6 The proportion, however, of method non-adherence as defined in this analysis (ie, did not receive randomised method at baseline or discontinued randomised method at any point during follow-up), was greater in the DMPA-IM group (26%), followed by the copper IUD (18%) and LNG implant (12%) groups. Timing of discontinuation also differed across methods.

During the first 6 months, method discontinuation was highest in the copper IUD group (7%) followed closely by DMPA-IM (6%) and LNG implant (4%) groups. Between 7 and 12 months of follow-up, it was highest in DMPA-IM group (15%), with equivalent proportions in the LNG implant (5%) and copper IUD (5%) groups.Point prevalences of chlamydia and gonorrhoea at baseline and final visitsIn total, 18% of women had chlamydia at baseline (figure 2A) and 15% at the final visit. Among women 24 years and younger, 22% and 20% had chlamydia at baseline and final visits, respectively. Women aged 25–35 at baseline were less likely to have chlamydia at both baseline (12%) and final visits (8%) compared with younger women.

Baseline chlamydia prevalence ranged from 5% in Zambia to 28% in the Western Cape, South Africa (figure 2B).Point prevalence (per 100 persons) of chlamydia and gonorrhoea at baseline and final visit by age category and study site region. Y-axis scale differs for chlamydia and gonorrhoea figures." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 2 Point prevalence (per 100 persons) of chlamydia and gonorrhoea at baseline and final visit by age category and study site region. Y-axis scale differs for chlamydia and gonorrhoea figures.Among all women, 5% had gonorrhoea at baseline and the final visit (figure 2C). Women aged 24 and younger were more likely to have gonorrhoea compared with women aged 25 and older at both baseline (5% vs 4%, respectively) and the final visit (6% vs 3%, respectively).

Baseline gonorrhoea prevalence ranged from 3% in Zambia and Kenya to 9% in the Western Cape, South Africa (figure 2D). Similar prevalences were observed at the final visit.Point prevalences of chlamydia and gonorrhoea at final visit by randomised contraceptive methodFourteen per cent of women randomised to DMPA-IM, 15% to copper IUD and 17% to LNG implant had chlamydia at the final visit (table 2).View this table:Table 2 Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae prevalence at final visitThe prevalence of chlamydia did not significantly differ between DMPA-IM and copper IUD groups (PR 0.90, 95% CI (0.79 to 1.04)) or between copper IUD and LNG implant groups (PR 0.92, 95% CI (0.81 to 1.04)). Women in the DMPA-IM group, however, had a significantly lower risk of chlamydia compared with the LNG implant group (PR. 0.83, 95% CI (0.72 to 0.95)).

Findings from the consistent use analysis were similar, and neither age nor HSV-2 status modified the observed associations.Four per cent of women randomised to DMPA-IM, 6% to copper IUD and 5% to LNG implant had gonorrhoea at the final visit (table 2). Gonorrhoea prevalence did not significantly differ between DMPA-IM and LNG implant groups (PR. 0.79, 95% CI (0.61 to 1.03)) or between copper IUD and LNG implant groups (PR. 1.18, 95% CI (0.93 to 1.49)).

Women in the DMPA-IM group had a significantly lower risk of gonorrhoea compared with women in the copper IUD group (PR. 0.67, 95% CI (0.52 to 0.87)). Results from as randomised and continuous use analyses did not differ. And again, neither age nor HSV-2 status modified the observed associations.Clinical assessment by randomised contraceptive methodTo assess the potential for outcome ascertainment bias, we evaluated the frequency of pelvic examinations and abdominal/pelvic pain and discharge by study arm.

Women in the copper IUD group were generally more likely to receive a pelvic examination during follow-up as compared with women in the DMPA-IM and LNG implant groups (online supplemental appendix 1). Similarly, abdominal/pelvic pain on examination or abnormal discharge was observed most frequently in the copper IUD group. The number of pelvic examinations met the prespecified criteria for retention in the adjusted gonorrhoea model but not in the chlamydia model.Supplemental materialFrequency of syndromic symptoms and potential reAmong women who had chlamydia at baseline, 23% were also positive at the final visit (online supplemental appendix 2, figure 3A). Nine per cent of gonorrhoea-positive women at baseline were also positive at the final visit (online supplemental appendix 2, figure 3B).

Across both baseline and final visits, a minority of women with chlamydia or gonorrhoea presented with signs and/or symptoms. Among chlamydia-positive women, only 12% presented with either abnormal vaginal discharge and/or abdominal/pelvic pain at their test-positive visit (online supplemental appendix 2, figure 3C). Similarly, only 15% of gonorrhoea-positive women presented with abnormal vaginal discharge and/or abdominal/pelvic pain at their test-positive visit (online supplemental appendix 2, figure 3D).Potential re and symptoms among women with chlamydia or gonorrhoea. Data are pooled across the screening and final visits in figures (C) and (D).

Symptomatic is defined as presenting with abnormal vaginal discharge and/or abdominal/pelvic pain. Final visit is described as potential re because test of cure was not conducted following baseline diagnosis and treatment." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 3 Potential re and symptoms among women with chlamydia or gonorrhoea. Data are pooled across the screening and final visits in figures (C) and (D). Symptomatic is defined as presenting with abnormal vaginal discharge and/or abdominal/pelvic pain.

Final visit is described as potential re because test of cure was not conducted following baseline diagnosis and treatment.DiscussionWe observed differences in final prevalences of chlamydia and gonorrhoea by contraceptive group in both as-randomised and consistent-use analyses. The DMPA-IM group had lower final visit chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences as compared with copper IUD and LNG implant groups, though only the DMPA-IM versus the copper IUD comparison of gonorrhoea and DMPA-IM versus LNG implant comparison of chlamydia reached statistical significance. These are novel findings that have not previously been reported to our knowledge and were determined in a randomised trial setting with high participant retention, robust biomarker testing and high randomised method adherence. Interestingly, the copper IUD group had higher gonorrhoea and lower chlamydia prevalence compared with the LNG implant group, though neither finding was statistically significant.Two recent systematic reviews of the association between contraceptives and STIs found inconsistent and insufficient evidence on the association between the contraceptive methods under study in ECHO and chlamydia and gonorrhoea.8 9 Neither systematic review identified any randomised studies or any direct comparative evidence for DMPA-IM, copper IUD and LNG implant, thus enabling a unique scientific contribution from this secondary trial analysis.

Nonetheless, these findings should be interpreted in light of biological plausibility, as well as the design strengths and limitations of this analysis.The emerging science on the biological mechanisms underlying HIV susceptibility demonstrates the complex relationship between the infectious pathogen, the host innate and adaptive immune response and the interaction of both with the vaginal microbiome and other -omes. Data on these factors in relationship to chlamydia and gonorrhoea acquisition are much more limited but can be assumed to be equally complex. Vaginal microbiome composition, including microbial metabolic by-products, have been shown to significantly modify risk of HIV acquisition and to vary with exogenous hormone exposure, menstrual cycle phase, ethnicity and geography.10–12 These same biological principles likely apply to chlamydia and gonorrhoea susceptibility. While DMPA-IM has been associated with decreased bacterial vaginosis (BV), initiation of the copper IUD has been associated with increased BV prevalence, and BV is associated with chlamydia and gonorrhoea acquisition.13 14 Moreover, Lactobacillus crispatus, which is less abundant in BV, has been shown to inhibit HeLa cell by Chlamydia trachomatis and inhibits growth of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in animal models.15 16 In addition, microbial community state types that are deficient in Lactobacillus crispatus and/or dominated by dysbiotic species are associated with inflammation, which is a driver of both STI and HIV susceptibility.

Thus, while the exact mechanisms of chlamydia and gonorrhoea in the presence of exogenous hormones and varying host microbiomes are unknown, it is biologically plausible that these complex factors may result in differential susceptibility to chlamydia and gonorrhoea among DMPA-IM, copper IUD and LNG implant users.An alternative explanation for these findings may be postrandomisation differences in clinical care and/or sexual behaviour. Participants in the copper IUD arm were more likely to have pelvic examinations and more likely to have discharge compared with women in the DMPA-IM and LNG implant groups. While interim STI testing and/or treatment were not documented, women in the copper IUD arm may have been more likely to receive syndromic STI treatment during follow-up due to more examination and observed discharge. More frequent STI treatment in the copper IUD group would theoretically lower the final visit point prevalence relative to women in the DMPA-IM and LNG implant arms, suggesting that the observed lower risk of STI in the DMPA-IM arm is not due to differential examination, testing and treatment.

Differential sexual risk behaviour may also have influenced the results. As reported previously, women in the DMPA-IM group less frequently reported condomless sex and multiple partners than women in the other groups, and both DMPA-IM and LNG implant users less frequently reported new partners and sex during menses than copper IUD users.6 Statistical control of self-reported sexual risk behaviour in the consistent-use analysis may have been inadequate if self-reported sexual behaviour was inaccurately or insufficiently reported.A second alternative explanation may be differences in randomised method non-adherence, which was greater in the DMPA-IM group, compared with copper IUD and LNG implant groups. Yet, the consistency of findings in the as-randomised and continuous use analyses suggests that method non-adherence had minimal effect on study outcomes. Taken as a whole, these findings indicate that there may be real differences in chlamydia and gonorrhoea risk associated with use of DMPA-IM, the copper IUD and LNG implant.

However, any true differential risk by method must be evaluated in light of the holistic benefits and risks of each method.The high observed chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences, despite intensive counselling and condom provision, warrants attention, particularly among women ages 24 years and younger and among women in South Africa and Eswatini. While the ECHO study was conducted in settings of high HIV/STI incidence, enrolment criteria did not purposefully target women at highest risk of HIV/STI in the trial communities, suggesting that the observed prevalences may be broadly applicable to women seeking effective contraception in those settings. Improved approaches are needed to prevent STIs, including options for expedited partner treatment, to prevent re.As expected, few women testing positive for chlamydia or gonorrhoea presented with symptoms (12% and 15%, respectively), and a substantial proportion of women who were positive and treated at baseline were infected at the final visit despite syndromic management during the follow-up. Given that syndromic management is the standard of care within primary health facilities in most trial settings, these data suggest that a large proportion of among reproductive aged women is missed, exacerbating the burden of curable STIs and associated morbidities.

Routine access to more reliable diagnostics, like NAAT and novel point-of-care diagnostic tests, will be key to managing asymptomatic STIs and reducing STI prevalence and related morbidities in these settings.17This secondary analysis of the ECHO trial has strengths and limitations. Strengths include the randomised design with comparator groups of equal STI baseline risk. Participants had high adherence to their randomised contraceptive method.6 While all participants received standardised clinical care and counselling, the unblinded randomisation may have allowed postrandomisation differences in STI risk over time by method. It is possible that participants modified their risk-taking behaviour based on study counselling messages regarding the potential association between DMPA-IM and HIV.In conclusion, our analyses suggest that DMPA-IM users may have lower risk of chlamydia and gonorrhoea compared with LNG implant and copper IUD users, respectively.

Further investigation is warranted to better understand the mechanisms of chlamydia and gonorrhoea susceptibility in the context of contraceptive use. Moreover, the high chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences in this population, independent of contraceptive method, warrants urgent attention.Key messagesThe prevalence of chlamydia and gonorrhoea varied by contraceptive method in this randomised trial.High chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences, despite intensive counselling and condom provision, warrants attention, particularly among young women in South Africa and Eswatini.Most chlamydia and gonorrhoea s were asymptomatic. Therefore, routine access to reliable diagnostics are needed to effectively manage and prevent STIs in African women..

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AbstractIntroduction click reference ventolin salbutamol sulphate. We report a very rare case of familial breast cancer and diffuse gastric cancer, with germline pathogenic variants in both BRCA1 and CDH1 genes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of such an association.Family ventolin salbutamol sulphate description. The proband is a woman diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 52 years.

She requested ventolin salbutamol sulphate genetic counselling in 2012, at the age of 91 years, because of a history of breast cancer in her daughter, her sister, her niece and her paternal grandmother and was therefore concerned about her relatives. Her sister and maternal aunt also had gastric cancer. She was tested for several genes associated with ventolin salbutamol sulphate hereditary breast cancer.Results. A large deletion of BRCA1 from exons 1 to 7 and two CDH1 pathogenic cis variants were identified.Conclusion.

This complex situation ventolin salbutamol sulphate is challenging for genetic counselling and management of at-risk individuals.cancer. Breastcancer. Gastricclinical geneticsgenetic screening/counsellingmolecular geneticsIntroductionGLI-Kruppel family member 3 (GLI3) encodes for a zinc finger transcription factor which plays a ventolin salbutamol sulphate key role in the sonic hedgehog (SHH) signalling pathway essential in both limb and craniofacial development.1 2 In hand development, SHH is expressed in the zone of polarising activity (ZPA) on the posterior side of the handplate. The ZPA expresses SHH, creating a gradient of SHH from the posterior to the anterior side of the handplate.

In the presence of SHH, full length GLI3-protein is produced (GLI3A), whereas absence of SHH causes cleavage of GLI3 into its repressor form (GLI3R).3 4 Abnormal expression ventolin salbutamol sulphate of this SHH/GLI3R gradient can cause both preaxial and postaxial polydactyly.2Concordantly, pathogenic DNA variants in the GLI3 gene are known to cause multiple syndromes with craniofacial and limb involvement, such as. Acrocallosal syndrome5 (OMIM. 200990), Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome6 (OMIM ventolin salbutamol sulphate. 175700) and Pallister-Hall syndrome7 (OMIM.

146510). Also, in non-syndromic polydactyly, such as preaxial polydactyly-type 4 (PPD4, OMIM. 174700),8 pathogenic variants in GLI3 have been described. Out of these diseases, Pallister-Hall syndrome is the most distinct entity, defined by the presence of central polydactyly and hypothalamic hamartoma.9 The other GLI3 syndromes are defined by the presence of preaxial and/or postaxial polydactyly of the hand and feet with or without syndactyly (Greig syndrome, PPD4).

Also, various mild craniofacial features such as hypertelorism and macrocephaly can occur. Pallister-Hall syndrome is caused by truncating variants in the middle third of the GLI3 gene.10–12 The truncation of GLI3 causes an overexpression of GLI3R, which is believed to be the key difference between Pallister-Hall and the GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes.9 11 Although multiple attempts have been made, the clinical and genetic distinction between the GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes is less evident. This has for example led to the introduction of subGreig and the formulation of an Oro-facial-digital overlap syndrome.10 Other authors, suggested that we should not regard these diseases as separate entities, but as a spectrum of GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes.13Although phenotype/genotype correlation of the different syndromes has been cumbersome, clinical and animal studies do provide evidence that distinct regions within the gene, could be related to the individual anomalies contributing to these syndromes. First, case studies show isolated preaxial polydactyly is caused by both truncating and non-truncating variants throughout the GLI3 gene, whereas in isolated postaxial polydactyly cases truncating variants at the C-terminal side of the gene are observed.12 14 These results suggest two different groups of variants for preaxial and postaxial polydactyly.

Second, recent animal studies suggest that posterior malformations in GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes are likely related to a dosage effect of GLI3R rather than due to the influence of an altered GLI3A expression.15Past attempts for phenotype/genotype correlation in GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes have directly related the diagnosed syndrome to the observed genotype.10–12 16 Focusing on individual hand phenotypes, such as preaxial and postaxial polydactyly and syndactyly might be more reliable because it prevents misclassification due to inconsistent use of syndrome definition. Subsequently, latent class analysis (LCA) provides the possibility to relate a group of observed variables to a set of latent, or unmeasured, parameters and thereby identifying different subgroups in the obtained dataset.17 As a result, LCA allows us to group different phenotypes within the GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes and relate the most important predictors of the grouped phenotypes to the observed GLI3 variants.The aim of our study was to further investigate the correlation of the individual phenotypes to the genotypes observed in GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes, using LCA. Cases were obtained by both literature review and the inclusion of local clinical cases. Subsequently, we identified two subclasses of limb anomalies that relate to the underlying GLI3 variant.

We provide evidence for two different phenotypic and genotypic groups with predominantly preaxial and postaxial hand and feet anomalies, and we specify those cases with a higher risk for corpus callosum anomalies.MethodsLiterature reviewThe Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD Professional 2019) was reviewed to identify known pathogenic variants in GLI3 and corresponding phenotypes.18 All references were obtained and cases were included when they were diagnosed with either Greig or subGreig syndrome or PPD4.10–12 Pallister-Hall syndrome and acrocallosal syndrome were excluded because both are regarded distinct syndromes and rather defined by the presence of the non-hand anomalies, than the presence of preaxial or postaxial polydactyly.13 19 Isolated preaxial or postaxial polydactyly were excluded for two reasons. The phenotype/genotype correlations are better understood and both anomalies can occur sporadically which could introduce falsely assumed pathogenic GLI3 variants in the analysis. Additionally, cases were excluded when case-specific phenotypic or genotypic information was not reported or if these two could not be related to each other. Families with a combined phenotypic description, not reducible to individual family members, were included as one case in the analysis.Clinical casesThe Sophia Children’s Hospital Database was reviewed for cases with a GLI3 variant.

Within this population, the same inclusion criteria for the phenotype were valid. Relatives of the index patients were also contacted for participation in this study, when they showed comparable hand, foot, or craniofacial malformations or when a GLI3 variant was identified. Phenotypes of the hand, foot and craniofacial anomalies of the patients treated in the Sophia Children's Hospital were collected using patient documentation. Family members were identified and if possible, clinically verified.

Alternatively, family members were contacted to verify their phenotypes. If no verification was possible, cases were excluded.PhenotypesThe phenotypes of both literature cases and local cases were extracted in a similar fashion. The most frequently reported limb and craniofacial phenotypes were dichotomised. The dichotomised hand and foot phenotypes were preaxial polydactyly, postaxial polydactyly and syndactyly.

Broad halluces or thumbs were commonly reported by authors and were dichotomised as a presentation of preaxial polydactyly. The extracted dichotomised craniofacial phenotypes were hypertelorism, macrocephaly and corpus callosum agenesis. All other phenotypes were registered, but not dichotomised.Pathogenic GLI3 variantsAll GLI3 variants were extracted and checked using Alamut Visual V.2.14. If indicated, variants were renamed according to standard Human Genome Variation Society nomenclature.20 Variants were grouped in either missense, frameshift, nonsense or splice site variants.

In the group of frameshift variants, a subgroup with possible splice site effect were identified for subgroup analysis when indicated. Similarly, nonsense variants prone for nonsense mediated decay (NMD) and nonsense variants with experimentally confirmed NMD were identified.21 Deletions of multiple exons, CNVs and translocations were excluded for analysis. A full list of included mutations is available in the online supplementary materials.Supplemental materialThe location of the variant was compared with five known structural domains of the GLI3 gene. (1) repressor domain, (2) zinc finger domain, (3) cleavage site, (4) activator domain, which we defined as a concatenation of the separately identified transactivation zones, the CBP binding domain and the mediator binding domain (MBD) and (5) the MID1 interaction region domain.1 6 22–24 The boundaries of each of the domains were based on available literature (figure 1, exact locations available in the online supplementary materials).

The boundaries used by different authors did vary, therefore a consensus was made.In this figure the posterior probability of an anterior phenotype is plotted against the location of the variant, stratified for the type of mutation that was observed. For better overview, only variants with a location effect were displayed. The full figure, including all variant types, can be found in the online supplementary figure 1. Each mutation is depicted as a dot, the size of the dot represents the number of observations for that variant.

If multiple observations were made, the mean posterior odds and IQR are plotted. For the nonsense variants, variants that were predicted to produce nonsense mediated decay, are depicted using a triangle. Again, the size indicates the number of observations." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 1 In this figure the posterior probability of an anterior phenotype is plotted against the location of the variant, stratified for the type of mutation that was observed. For better overview, only variants with a location effect were displayed.

The full figure, including all variant types, can be found in the online supplementary figure 1. Each mutation is depicted as a dot, the size of the dot represents the number of observations for that variant. If multiple observations were made, the mean posterior odds and IQR are plotted. For the nonsense variants, variants that were predicted to produce nonsense mediated decay, are depicted using a triangle.

Again, the size indicates the number of observations.Supplemental materialLatent class analysisTo cluster phenotypes and relate those to the genotypes of the patients, an explorative analysis was done using LCA in R (R V.3.6.1 for Mac. Polytomous variable LCA, poLCA V.1.4.1.). We used our LCA to detect the number of phenotypic subgroups in the dataset and subsequently predict a class membership for each case in the dataset based on the posterior probabilities.In order to make a reliable prediction, only phenotypes that were sufficiently reported and/or ruled out were feasible for LCA, limiting the analysis to preaxial polydactyly, postaxial polydactyly and syndactyly of the hands and feet. Only full cases were included.

To determine the optimal number of classes, we fitted a series of models ranging from a one-class to a six-class model. The optimal number of classes was based on the conditional Akaike information criterion (cAIC), the non adjusted and the sample-size adjusted Bayesian information criterion (BIC and aBIC) and the obtained entropy.25 The explorative LCA produces both posterior probabilities per case for both classes and predicted class membership. Using the predicted class membership, the phenotypic features per class were determined in a univariate analysis (χ2, SPSS V.25). Using the posterior probabilities on latent class (LC) membership, a scatter plot was created using the location of the variant on the x-axis and the probability of class membership on the y-axis for each of the types of variants (Tibco Spotfire V.7.14).

Using these scatter plots, variants that give similar phenotypes were clustered.Genotype/phenotype correlationBecause an LC has no clinical value, the correlation between genotypes and phenotypes was investigated using the predictor phenotypes and the clustered phenotypes. First, those phenotypes that contribute most to LC membership were identified. Second those phenotypes were directly related to the different types of variants (missense, nonsense, frameshift, splice site) and their clustered locations. Quantification of the relation was performed using a univariate analysis using a χ2 test.

Because of our selection criteria, meaning patients at least have two phenotypes, a multivariate using a logistic regression analysis was used to detect the most significant predictors in the overall phenotype (SPSS V.25). Finally, we explored the relation of the clustered genotypes to the presence of corpus callosum agenesis, a rare malformation in GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes which cannot be readily diagnosed without additional imaging.ResultsWe included 251 patients from the literature and 46 local patients,10–12 16 21 26–43 in total 297 patients from 155 different families with 127 different GLI3 variants, 32 of which were large deletions, CNVs or translocations. In six local cases, the exact variant could not be retrieved by status research.The distribution of the most frequently observed phenotypes and variants are presented in table 1. Other recurring phenotypes included developmental delay (n=22), broad nasal root (n=23), frontal bossing or prominent forehead (n=16) and craniosynostosis (n=13), camptodactyly (n=8) and a broad first interdigital webspace of the foot (n=6).View this table:Table 1 Baseline phenotypes and genotypes of selected populationThe LCA model was fitted using the six defined hand/foot phenotypes.

Model fit indices for the LCA are displayed in table 2. Based on the BIC, a two-class model has the best fit for our data. The four-class Get More Information model does show a gain in entropy, however with a higher BIC and loss of df. Therefore, based on the majority of performance statistics and the interpretability of the model, a two-class model was chosen.

Table 3 displays the distribution of phenotypes and genotypes over the two classes.View this table:Table 2 Model fit indices for the one-class through six-class model evaluated in our LCAView this table:Table 3 Distribution of phenotypes and genotypes in the two latent classes (LC)Table 1 depicts the baseline phenotypes and genotypes in the obtained population. Note incomplete data especially in the cranium phenotypes. In total 259 valid genotypes were present. In total, 289 cases had complete data for all hand and foot phenotypes (preaxial polydactyly, postaxial polydactyly and syndactyly) and thus were available for LCA.

Combined, for phenotype/genotype correlation 258 cases were available with complete genotypes and complete hand and foot phenotypes.Table 2 depicts the model fit indices for all models that have been fitted to our data.Table 3 depicts the distribution of phenotypes and genotypes over the two assigned LCs. Hand and foot phenotypes were used as input for the LCA, thus are all complete cases. Malformation of the cranium and genotypes do have missing cases. Note that for the LCA, full case description was required, resulting in eight cases due to incomplete phenotypes.

Out of these eight, one also had a genotype that thus needed to be excluded. Missingness of genotypic data was higher in LC2, mostly due to CNVs (table 1).In 54/60 cases, a missense variant produced a posterior phenotype. Likewise, splice site variants show the same phenotype in 23/24 cases (table 3). For both frameshift and nonsense variants, this relation is not significant (52 anterior vs 54 posterior and 26 anterior vs 42 posterior, respectively).

Therefore, only for nonsense and frameshift variants the location of the variant was plotted against the probability for LC2 membership in figure 1. A full scatterplot of all variants is available in online supplementary figure 1.Figure 1 reveals a pattern for these nonsense and frameshift variants that reveals that variants at the C-terminal of the gene predict anterior phenotypes. When relating the domains of the GLI3 protein to the observed phenotype, we observe that the majority of patients with a nonsense or frameshift variant in the repressor domain, the zinc finger domain or the cleavage site had a high probability of an LC2/anterior phenotype. This group contains all variants that are either experimentally determined to be subject to NMD (triangle marker in figure 1) or predicted to be subject to NMD (diamond marker in figure 1).

Frameshift and nonsense variants in the activator domain result in high probability for an LC1/posterior phenotype. These variants will be further referred to as truncating variants in the activator domain.The univariate relation of the individual phenotypes to these two groups of variants are estimated and presented in table 4. In our multivariate analysis, postaxial polydactyly of the foot and hand are the strongest predictors (Beta. 2.548, p<0001 and Beta.

1.47, p=0.013, respectively) for patients to have a truncating variant in the activator domain. Moreover, the effect sizes of preaxial polydactyly of the hand and feet (Beta. ˆ’0.797, p=0123 and −1.772, p=0.001) reveals that especially postaxial polydactyly of the foot is the dominant predictor for the genetic substrate of the observed anomalies.View this table:Table 4 Univariate and multivariate analysis of the phenotype/genotype correlationTable 4 shows exploration of the individual phenotypes on the genotype, both univariate and multivariate. The multivariate analysis corrects for the presence of multiple phenotypes in the underlying population.Although the craniofacial anomalies could not be included in the LCA, the relation between the observed anomalies and the identified genetic substrates can be studied.

The prevalence of hypertelorism was equally distributed over the two groups of variants (47/135 vs 21/47 respectively, p<0.229). However for corpus callosum agenesis and macrocephaly, there was a higher prevalence in patients with a truncating variant in the activator domain (3/75 vs 11/41, p<0.001. OR. 8.8, p<0.001) and 42/123 vs 24/48, p<0.05).

Noteworthy is the fact that 11/14 cases with corpus callosum agenesis in the dataset had a truncating variant in the activator domain.DiscussionIn this report, we present new insights into the correlation between the phenotype and the genotype in patients with GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes. We illustrate that there are two LCs of patients, best predicted by postaxial polydactyly of the hand and foot for LC1, and the preaxial polydactyly of the hand and foot and syndactyly of the foot for LC2. Patients with postaxial phenotypes have a higher risk of having a truncating variant in the activator domain of the GLI3 gene which is also related to a higher risk of corpus callosum agenesis. These results suggest a functional difference between truncating variants on the N-terminal and the C-terminal side of the GLI3 cleavage site.Previous attempts of phenotype to genotype correlation have not yet provided the clinical confirmation of these assumed mechanisms in the pathophysiology of GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes.

Johnston et al have successfully determined the Pallister-Hall region in which truncating variants produce a Pallister-Hall phenotype rather than Greig syndrome.11 However, in their latest population study, subtypes of both syndromes were included to explain the full spectrum of observed malformations. In 2015, Demurger et al reported the higher incidence of corpus callosum agenesis in the Greig syndrome population with truncating mutations in the activator domain.12 Al-Qattan in his review summarises the concept of a spectrum of anomalies dependent on haplo-insufficiency (through different mechanisms) and repressor overexpression.13 However, he bases this theory mainly on reviewed experimental data. Our report is the first to provide an extensive clinical review of cases that substantiate the phenotypic difference between the two groups that could fit the suggested mechanisms. We agree with Al-Qattan et al that a variation of anomalies can be observed given any pathogenic variant in the GLI3 gene, but overall two dominant phenotypes are present.

A population with predominantly preaxial anomalies and one with postaxial anomalies. The presence of preaxial or postaxial polydactyly and syndactyly is not mutually exclusive for one of these two subclasses. Meaning that preaxial polydactyly can co-occur with postaxial polydactyly. However, truncating mutations in the activator domain produce a postaxial phenotype, as can be derived from the risk in table 4.

The higher risk of corpus callosum agenesis in this population shows that differentiating between a preaxial phenotype and a postaxial phenotype, instead of between the different GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes, might be more relevant regarding diagnostics for corpus callosum agenesis.We chose to use LCA as an exploratory tool only in our population for two reasons. First of all, LCA can be useful to identify subgroups, but there is no ‘true’ model or number of subgroups you can detect. The best fitting model can only be estimated based on the available measures and approximates the true subgroups that might be present. Second, LC membership assignment is a statistical procedure based on the posterior probability, with concordant errors of the estimation, rather than a clinical value that can be measured or evaluated.

Therefore, we decided to use our LCA only in an exploratory tool, and perform our statistics using the actual phenotypes that predict LC membership and the associated genotypes. Overall, this method worked well to differentiate the two subgroups present in our dataset. However, outliers were observed. A qualitative analysis of these outliers is available in the online supplementary data.The genetic substrate for the two phenotypic clusters can be discussed based on multiple experiments.

Overall, we hypothesise two genetic clusters. One that is due to haploinsufficiency and one that is due to abnormal truncation of the activator. The hypothesised cluster of variants that produce haploinsufficiency is mainly based on the experimental data that confirms NMD in two variants and the NMD prediction of other nonsense variants in Alamut. For the frameshift variants, it is also likely that the cleavage of the zinc finger domain results in functional haploinsufficiency either because of a lack of signalling domains or similarly due to NMD.

Missense variants could cause haploinsufficiency through the suggested mechanism by Krauss et al who have illustrated that missense variants in the MID1 domain hamper the functional interaction with the MID1-α4-PP2A complex, leading to a subcellular location of GLI3.24 The observed missense variants in our study exceed the region to which Krauss et al have limited the MID-1 interaction domain. An alternative theory is suggested by Zhou et al who have shown that missense variants in the MBD can cause deficiency in the signalling of GLI3A, functionally implicating a relative overexpression of GLI3R.22 However, GLI3R overexpression would likely produce a posterior phenotype, as determined by Hill et al in their fixed homo and hemizygous GLI3R models.15 Therefore, our hypothesis is that all included missense variants have a similar pathogenesis which is more likely in concordance with the mechanism introduced by Krauss et al. To our knowledge, no splice site variants have been functionally described in literature. However, it is noted that the 15 and last exon encompasses the entire activator domain, thus any splice site mutation is by definition located on the 5′ side of the activator.

Based on the phenotype, we would suggest that these variants fail to produce a functional protein. We hypothesise that the truncating variants of the activator domain lead to overexpression of GLI3R in SHH rich areas. In normal development, the presence of SHH prevents the processing of full length GLI34 into GLI3R, thus producing the full length activator. In patients with a truncating variant of the activator domain of GLI3, thus these variants likely have the largest effect in SHH rich areas, such as the ZPA located at the posterior side of the hand/footplate.

Moreover, the lack of posterior anomalies in the GLI3∆699/- mouse model (hemizygous fixed repressor model) compared with the GLI3∆699/∆699 mouse model (homozygous fixed repressor model), suggesting a dosage effect of GLI3R to be responsible for posterior hand anomalies.15 These findings are supported by Lewandowski et al, who show that the majority of the target genes in GLI signalling are regulated by GLI3R rather than GLI3A.44 Together, these findings suggest a role for the location and type of variant in GLI3-mediated syndromes.Interestingly, the difference between Pallister-Hall syndrome and GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes has also been attributed to the GLI3R overexpression. However, the difference in phenotype observed in the cases with a truncating variant in the activator domain and Pallister-Hall syndrome suggest different functional consequences. When studying figure 1, it is noted that the included truncating variants on the 3′ side of the cleavage site seldomly affect the CBP binding region, which could provide an explanation for the observed differences. This binding region is included in the Pallister-Hall region as defined by Johnston et al and is necessary for the downstream signalling with GLI1.10 11 23 45 Interestingly, recent reports show that pathogenic variants in GLI1 can produce phenotypes concordant with Ellis von Krefeld syndrome, which includes overlapping features with Pallister-Hall syndrome.46 The four truncating variants observed in this study that do affect the CBP but did not result in a Pallister-Hall phenotype are conflicting with this theory.

Krauss et al postulate an alternative hypothesis, they state that the MID1-α4-PP2A complex, which is essential for GLI3A signalling, could also be the reason for overlapping features of Opitz syndrome, caused by variants in MID1, and Pallister-Hall syndrome. Further analysis is required to fully appreciate the functional differences between truncating mutations that cause Pallister-Hall syndrome and those that result in GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes.For the clinical evaluation of patients with GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes, intracranial anomalies are likely the most important to predict based on the variant. Unfortunately, the presence of corpus callosum agenesis was not routinely investigated or reported thus this feature could not be used as an indicator phenotype for LC membership. Interestingly when using only hand and foot phenotypes, we did notice a higher prevalence of corpus callosum agenesis in patients with posterior phenotypes.

The suggested relation between truncating mutations in the activator domain causing these posterior phenotypes and corpus callosum agenesis was statistically confirmed (OR. 8.8, p<0.001). Functionally this relation could be caused by the GLI3-MED12 interaction at the MBD. Pathogenic DNA variants in MED12 can cause Opitz-Kaveggia syndrome, a syndrome in which presentation includes corpus callosum agenesis, broad halluces and thumbs.47In conclusion, there are two distinct phenotypes within the GLI3-mediated polydactyly population.

Patients with more posteriorly and more anteriorly oriented hand anomalies. Furthermore, this difference is related to the observed variant in GLI3. We hypothesise that variants that cause haploinsufficiency produce anterior anomalies of the hand, whereas variants with abnormal truncation of the activator domain have more posterior anomalies. Furthermore, patients that have a variant that produces abnormal truncation of the activator domain, have a greater risk for corpus callosum agenesis.

Thus, we advocate to differentiate preaxial or postaxial oriented GLI3 phenotypes to explain the pathophysiology as well as to get a risk assessment for corpus callosum agenesis.Data availability statementData are available upon reasonable request.Ethics statementsPatient consent for publicationNot required.Ethics approvalThe research protocol was approved by the local ethics board of the Erasmus MC University Medical Center (MEC 2015-679)..

AbstractIntroduction can i buy ventolin online who can buy ventolin online. We report a very rare case of familial breast cancer and diffuse gastric cancer, with germline pathogenic variants in both BRCA1 and CDH1 genes. To the best who can buy ventolin online of our knowledge, this is the first report of such an association.Family description.

The proband is a woman diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 52 years. She requested genetic counselling in 2012, at the age of 91 years, because of a history of breast cancer in her daughter, her sister, her niece who can buy ventolin online and her paternal grandmother and was therefore concerned about her relatives. Her sister and maternal aunt also had gastric cancer.

She was tested for who can buy ventolin online several genes associated with hereditary breast cancer.Results. A large deletion of BRCA1 from exons 1 to 7 and two CDH1 pathogenic cis variants were identified.Conclusion. This complex situation is challenging for genetic counselling and management of at-risk individuals.cancer who can buy ventolin online.

Breastcancer. Gastricclinical geneticsgenetic screening/counsellingmolecular geneticsIntroductionGLI-Kruppel family member 3 (GLI3) encodes for a zinc finger transcription factor which plays a who can buy ventolin online key role in the sonic hedgehog (SHH) signalling pathway essential in both limb and craniofacial development.1 2 In hand development, SHH is expressed in the zone of polarising activity (ZPA) on the posterior side of the handplate. The ZPA expresses SHH, creating a gradient of SHH from the posterior to the anterior side of the handplate.

In the presence of SHH, full length GLI3-protein is produced (GLI3A), whereas absence of SHH causes who can buy ventolin online cleavage of GLI3 into its repressor form (GLI3R).3 4 Abnormal expression of this SHH/GLI3R gradient can cause both preaxial and postaxial polydactyly.2Concordantly, pathogenic DNA variants in the GLI3 gene are known to cause multiple syndromes with craniofacial and limb involvement, such as. Acrocallosal syndrome5 (OMIM. 200990), Greig who can buy ventolin online cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome6 (OMIM.

175700) and Pallister-Hall syndrome7 (OMIM. 146510). Also, in non-syndromic polydactyly, such as preaxial polydactyly-type 4 (PPD4, OMIM.

174700),8 pathogenic variants in GLI3 have been described. Out of these diseases, Pallister-Hall syndrome is the most distinct entity, defined by the presence of central polydactyly and hypothalamic hamartoma.9 The other GLI3 syndromes are defined by the presence of preaxial and/or postaxial polydactyly of the hand and feet with or without syndactyly (Greig syndrome, PPD4). Also, various mild craniofacial features such as hypertelorism and macrocephaly can occur.

Pallister-Hall syndrome is caused by truncating variants in the middle third of the GLI3 gene.10–12 The truncation of GLI3 causes an overexpression of GLI3R, which is believed to be the key difference between Pallister-Hall and the GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes.9 11 Although multiple attempts have been made, the clinical and genetic distinction between the GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes is less evident. This has for example led to the introduction of subGreig and the formulation of an Oro-facial-digital overlap syndrome.10 Other authors, suggested that we should not regard these diseases as separate entities, but as a spectrum of GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes.13Although phenotype/genotype correlation of the different syndromes has been cumbersome, clinical and animal studies do provide evidence that distinct regions within the gene, could be related to the individual anomalies contributing to these syndromes. First, case studies show isolated preaxial polydactyly is caused by both truncating and non-truncating variants throughout the GLI3 gene, whereas in isolated postaxial polydactyly cases truncating variants at the C-terminal side of the gene are observed.12 14 These results suggest two different groups of variants for preaxial and postaxial polydactyly.

Second, recent animal studies suggest that posterior malformations in GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes are likely related to a dosage effect of GLI3R rather than due to the influence of an altered GLI3A expression.15Past attempts for phenotype/genotype correlation in GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes have directly related the diagnosed syndrome to the observed genotype.10–12 16 Focusing on individual hand phenotypes, such as preaxial and postaxial polydactyly and syndactyly might be more reliable because it prevents misclassification due to inconsistent use of syndrome definition. Subsequently, latent class analysis (LCA) provides the possibility to relate a group of observed variables to a set of latent, or unmeasured, parameters and thereby identifying different subgroups in the obtained dataset.17 As a result, LCA allows us to group different phenotypes within the GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes and relate the most important predictors of the grouped phenotypes to the observed GLI3 variants.The aim of our study was to further investigate the correlation of the individual phenotypes to the genotypes observed in GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes, using LCA. Cases were obtained by both literature review and the inclusion of local clinical cases.

Subsequently, we identified two subclasses of limb anomalies that relate to the underlying GLI3 variant. We provide evidence for two different phenotypic and genotypic groups with predominantly preaxial and postaxial hand and feet anomalies, and we specify those cases with a higher risk for corpus callosum anomalies.MethodsLiterature reviewThe Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD Professional 2019) was reviewed to identify known pathogenic variants in GLI3 and corresponding phenotypes.18 All references were obtained and cases were included when they were diagnosed with either Greig or subGreig syndrome or PPD4.10–12 Pallister-Hall syndrome and acrocallosal syndrome were excluded because both are regarded distinct syndromes and rather defined by the presence of the non-hand anomalies, than the presence of preaxial or postaxial polydactyly.13 19 Isolated preaxial or postaxial polydactyly were excluded for two reasons. The phenotype/genotype correlations are better understood and both anomalies can occur sporadically which could introduce falsely assumed pathogenic GLI3 variants in the analysis.

Additionally, cases were excluded when case-specific phenotypic or genotypic information was not reported or if these two could not be related to each other. Families with a combined phenotypic description, not reducible to individual family members, were included as one case in the analysis.Clinical casesThe Sophia Children’s Hospital Database was reviewed for cases with a GLI3 variant. Within this population, the same inclusion criteria for the phenotype were valid.

Relatives of the index patients were also contacted for participation in this study, when they showed comparable hand, foot, or craniofacial malformations or when a GLI3 variant was identified. Phenotypes of the hand, foot and craniofacial anomalies of the patients treated in the Sophia Children's Hospital were collected using patient documentation. Family members were identified and if possible, clinically verified.

Alternatively, family members were contacted to verify their phenotypes. If no verification was possible, cases were excluded.PhenotypesThe phenotypes of both literature cases and local cases were extracted in a similar fashion. The most frequently reported limb and craniofacial phenotypes were dichotomised.

The dichotomised hand and foot phenotypes were preaxial polydactyly, postaxial polydactyly and syndactyly. Broad halluces or thumbs were commonly reported by authors and were dichotomised as a presentation of preaxial polydactyly. The extracted dichotomised craniofacial phenotypes were hypertelorism, macrocephaly and corpus callosum agenesis.

All other phenotypes were registered, but not dichotomised.Pathogenic GLI3 variantsAll GLI3 variants were extracted and checked using Alamut Visual V.2.14. If indicated, variants were renamed according to standard Human Genome Variation Society nomenclature.20 Variants were grouped in either missense, frameshift, nonsense or splice site variants. In the group of frameshift variants, a subgroup with possible splice site effect were identified for subgroup analysis when indicated.

Similarly, nonsense variants prone for nonsense mediated decay (NMD) and nonsense variants with experimentally confirmed NMD were identified.21 Deletions of multiple exons, CNVs and translocations were excluded for analysis. A full list of included mutations is available in the online supplementary materials.Supplemental materialThe location of the variant was compared with five known structural domains of the GLI3 gene. (1) repressor domain, (2) zinc finger domain, (3) cleavage site, (4) activator domain, which we defined as a concatenation of the separately identified transactivation zones, the CBP binding domain and the mediator binding domain (MBD) and (5) the MID1 interaction region domain.1 6 22–24 The boundaries of each of the domains were based on available literature (figure 1, exact locations available in the online supplementary materials).

The boundaries used by different authors did vary, therefore a consensus was made.In this figure the posterior probability of an anterior phenotype is plotted against the location of the variant, stratified for the type of mutation that was observed. For better overview, only variants with a location effect were displayed. The full figure, including all variant types, can be found in the online supplementary figure 1.

Each mutation is depicted as a dot, the size of the dot represents the number of observations for that variant. If multiple observations were made, the mean posterior odds and IQR are plotted. For the nonsense variants, variants that were predicted to produce nonsense mediated decay, are depicted using a triangle.

Again, the size indicates the number of observations." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 1 In this figure the posterior probability of an anterior phenotype is plotted against the location of the variant, stratified for the type of mutation that was observed. For better overview, only variants with a location effect were displayed. The full figure, including all variant types, can be found in the online supplementary figure 1.

Each mutation is depicted as a dot, the size of the dot represents the number of observations for that variant. If multiple observations were made, the mean posterior odds and IQR are plotted. For the nonsense variants, variants that were predicted to produce nonsense mediated decay, are depicted using a triangle.

Again, the size indicates the number of observations.Supplemental materialLatent class analysisTo cluster phenotypes and relate those to the genotypes of the patients, an explorative analysis was done using LCA in R (R V.3.6.1 for Mac. Polytomous variable LCA, poLCA V.1.4.1.). We used our LCA to detect the number of phenotypic subgroups in the dataset and subsequently predict a class membership for each case in the dataset based on the posterior probabilities.In order to make a reliable prediction, only phenotypes that were sufficiently reported and/or ruled out were feasible for LCA, limiting the analysis to preaxial polydactyly, postaxial polydactyly and syndactyly of the hands and feet.

Only full cases were included. To determine the optimal number of classes, we fitted a series of models ranging from a one-class to a six-class model. The optimal number of classes was based on the conditional Akaike information criterion (cAIC), the non adjusted and the sample-size adjusted Bayesian information criterion (BIC and aBIC) and the obtained entropy.25 The explorative LCA produces both posterior probabilities per case for both classes and predicted class membership.

Using the predicted class membership, the phenotypic features per class were determined in a univariate analysis (χ2, SPSS V.25). Using the posterior probabilities on latent class (LC) membership, a scatter plot was created using the location of the variant on the x-axis and the probability of class membership on the y-axis for each of the types of variants (Tibco Spotfire V.7.14). Using these scatter plots, variants that give similar phenotypes were clustered.Genotype/phenotype correlationBecause an LC has no clinical value, the correlation between genotypes and phenotypes was investigated using the predictor phenotypes and the clustered phenotypes.

First, those phenotypes that contribute most to LC membership were identified. Second those phenotypes were directly related to the different types of variants (missense, nonsense, frameshift, splice site) and their clustered locations. Quantification of the relation was performed using a univariate analysis using a χ2 test.

Because of our selection criteria, meaning patients at least have two phenotypes, a multivariate using a logistic regression analysis was used to detect the most significant predictors in the overall phenotype (SPSS V.25). Finally, we explored the relation of the clustered genotypes to the presence of corpus callosum agenesis, a rare malformation in GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes which cannot be readily diagnosed without additional imaging.ResultsWe included 251 patients from the literature and 46 local patients,10–12 16 21 26–43 in total 297 patients from 155 different families with 127 different GLI3 variants, 32 of which were large deletions, CNVs or translocations. In six local cases, the exact variant could not be retrieved by status research.The distribution of the most frequently observed phenotypes and variants are presented in table 1.

Other recurring phenotypes included developmental delay (n=22), broad nasal root (n=23), frontal bossing or prominent forehead (n=16) and craniosynostosis (n=13), camptodactyly (n=8) and a broad first interdigital webspace of the foot (n=6).View this table:Table 1 Baseline phenotypes and genotypes of selected populationThe LCA model was fitted using the six defined hand/foot phenotypes. Model fit indices for the LCA are displayed in table 2. Based on the BIC, a two-class model has the best fit for our data.

The four-class model does show a gain in entropy, http://www.mbstoday.org/mbs-introduces-interactive-bible-app/ however with a higher BIC and loss of df. Therefore, based on the majority of performance statistics and the interpretability of the model, a two-class model was chosen. Table 3 displays the distribution of phenotypes and genotypes over the two classes.View this table:Table 2 Model fit indices for the one-class through six-class model evaluated in our LCAView this table:Table 3 Distribution of phenotypes and genotypes in the two latent classes (LC)Table 1 depicts the baseline phenotypes and genotypes in the obtained population.

Note incomplete data especially in the cranium phenotypes. In total 259 valid genotypes were present. In total, 289 cases had complete data for all hand and foot phenotypes (preaxial polydactyly, postaxial polydactyly and syndactyly) and thus were available for LCA.

Combined, for phenotype/genotype correlation 258 cases were available with complete genotypes and complete hand and foot phenotypes.Table 2 depicts the model fit indices for all models that have been fitted to our data.Table 3 depicts the distribution of phenotypes and genotypes over the two assigned LCs. Hand and foot phenotypes were used as input for the LCA, thus are all complete cases. Malformation of the cranium and genotypes do have missing cases.

Note that for the LCA, full case description was required, resulting in eight cases due to incomplete phenotypes. Out of these eight, one also had a genotype that thus needed to be excluded. Missingness of genotypic data was higher in LC2, mostly due to CNVs (table 1).In 54/60 cases, a missense variant produced a posterior phenotype.

Likewise, splice site variants show the same phenotype in 23/24 cases (table 3). For both frameshift and nonsense variants, this relation is not significant (52 anterior vs 54 posterior and 26 anterior vs 42 posterior, respectively). Therefore, only for nonsense and frameshift variants the location of the variant was plotted against the probability for LC2 membership in figure 1.

A full scatterplot of all variants is available in online supplementary figure 1.Figure 1 reveals a pattern for these nonsense and frameshift variants that reveals that variants at the C-terminal of the gene predict anterior phenotypes. When relating the domains of the GLI3 protein to the observed phenotype, we observe that the majority of patients with a nonsense or frameshift variant in the repressor domain, the zinc finger domain or the cleavage site had a high probability of an LC2/anterior phenotype. This group contains all variants that are either experimentally determined to be subject to NMD (triangle marker in figure 1) or predicted to be subject to NMD (diamond marker in figure 1).

Frameshift and nonsense variants in the activator domain result in high probability for an LC1/posterior phenotype. These variants will be further referred to as truncating variants in the activator domain.The univariate relation of the individual phenotypes to these two groups of variants are estimated and presented in table 4. In our multivariate analysis, postaxial polydactyly of the foot and hand are the strongest predictors (Beta.

2.548, p<0001 and Beta. 1.47, p=0.013, respectively) for patients to have a truncating variant in the activator domain. Moreover, the effect sizes of preaxial polydactyly of the hand and feet (Beta.

ˆ’0.797, p=0123 and −1.772, p=0.001) reveals that especially postaxial polydactyly of the foot is the dominant predictor for the genetic substrate of the observed anomalies.View this table:Table 4 Univariate and multivariate analysis of the phenotype/genotype correlationTable 4 shows exploration of the individual phenotypes on the genotype, both univariate and multivariate. The multivariate analysis corrects for the presence of multiple phenotypes in the underlying population.Although the craniofacial anomalies could not be included in the LCA, the relation between the observed anomalies and the identified genetic substrates can be studied. The prevalence of hypertelorism was equally distributed over the two groups of variants (47/135 vs 21/47 respectively, p<0.229).

However for corpus callosum agenesis and macrocephaly, there was a higher prevalence in patients with a truncating variant in the activator domain (3/75 vs 11/41, p<0.001. OR. 8.8, p<0.001) and 42/123 vs 24/48, p<0.05).

Noteworthy is the fact that 11/14 cases with corpus callosum agenesis in the dataset had a truncating variant in the activator domain.DiscussionIn this report, we present new insights into the correlation between the phenotype and the genotype in patients with GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes. We illustrate that there are two LCs of patients, best predicted by postaxial polydactyly of the hand and foot for LC1, and the preaxial polydactyly of the hand and foot and syndactyly of the foot for LC2. Patients with postaxial phenotypes have a higher risk of having a truncating variant in the activator domain of the GLI3 gene which is also related to a higher risk of corpus callosum agenesis.

These results suggest a functional difference between truncating variants on the N-terminal and the C-terminal side of the GLI3 cleavage site.Previous attempts of phenotype to genotype correlation have not yet provided the clinical confirmation of these assumed mechanisms in the pathophysiology of GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes. Johnston et al have successfully determined the Pallister-Hall region in which truncating variants produce a Pallister-Hall phenotype rather than Greig syndrome.11 However, in their latest population study, subtypes of both syndromes were included to explain the full spectrum of observed malformations. In 2015, Demurger et al reported the higher incidence of corpus callosum agenesis in the Greig syndrome population with truncating mutations in the activator domain.12 Al-Qattan in his review summarises the concept of a spectrum of anomalies dependent on haplo-insufficiency (through different mechanisms) and repressor overexpression.13 However, he bases this theory mainly on reviewed experimental data.

Our report is the first to provide an extensive clinical review of cases that substantiate the phenotypic difference between the two groups that could fit the suggested mechanisms. We agree with Al-Qattan et al that a variation of anomalies can be observed given any pathogenic variant in the GLI3 gene, but overall two dominant phenotypes are present. A population with predominantly preaxial anomalies and one with postaxial anomalies.

The presence of preaxial or postaxial polydactyly and syndactyly is not mutually exclusive for one of these two subclasses. Meaning that preaxial polydactyly can co-occur with postaxial polydactyly. However, truncating mutations in the activator domain produce a postaxial phenotype, as can be derived from the risk in table 4.

The higher risk of corpus callosum agenesis in this population shows that differentiating between a preaxial phenotype and a postaxial phenotype, instead of between the different GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes, might be more relevant regarding diagnostics for corpus callosum agenesis.We chose to use LCA as an exploratory tool only in our population for two reasons. First of all, LCA can be useful to identify subgroups, but there is no ‘true’ model or number of subgroups you can detect. The best fitting model can only be estimated based on the available measures and approximates the true subgroups that might be present.

Second, LC membership assignment is a statistical procedure based on the posterior probability, with concordant errors of the estimation, rather than a clinical value that can be measured or evaluated. Therefore, we decided to use our LCA only in an exploratory tool, and perform our statistics using the actual phenotypes that predict LC membership and the associated genotypes. Overall, this method worked well to differentiate the two subgroups present in our dataset.

However, outliers were observed. A qualitative analysis of these outliers is available in the online supplementary data.The genetic substrate for the two phenotypic clusters can be discussed based on multiple experiments. Overall, we hypothesise two genetic clusters.

One that is due to haploinsufficiency and one that is due to abnormal truncation of the activator. The hypothesised cluster of variants that produce haploinsufficiency is mainly based on the experimental data that confirms NMD in two variants and the NMD prediction of other nonsense variants in Alamut. For the frameshift variants, it is also likely that the cleavage of the zinc finger domain results in functional haploinsufficiency either because of a lack of signalling domains or similarly due to NMD.

Missense variants could cause haploinsufficiency through the suggested mechanism by Krauss et al who have illustrated that missense variants in the MID1 domain hamper the functional interaction with the MID1-α4-PP2A complex, leading to a subcellular location of GLI3.24 The observed missense variants in our study exceed the region to which Krauss et al have limited the MID-1 interaction domain. An alternative theory is suggested by Zhou et al who have shown that missense variants in the MBD can cause deficiency in the signalling of GLI3A, functionally implicating a relative overexpression of GLI3R.22 However, GLI3R overexpression would likely produce a posterior phenotype, as determined by Hill et al in their fixed homo and hemizygous GLI3R models.15 Therefore, our hypothesis is that all included missense variants have a similar pathogenesis which is more likely in concordance with the mechanism introduced by Krauss et al. To our knowledge, no splice site variants have been functionally described in literature.

However, it is noted that the 15 and last exon encompasses the entire activator domain, thus any splice site mutation is by definition located on the 5′ side of the activator. Based on the phenotype, we would suggest that these variants fail to produce a functional protein. We hypothesise that the truncating variants of the activator domain lead to overexpression of GLI3R in SHH rich areas.

In normal development, the presence of SHH prevents the processing of full length GLI34 into GLI3R, thus producing the full length activator. In patients with a truncating variant of the activator domain of GLI3, thus these variants likely have the largest effect in SHH rich areas, such as the ZPA located at the posterior side of the hand/footplate. Moreover, the lack of posterior anomalies in the GLI3∆699/- mouse model (hemizygous fixed repressor model) compared with the GLI3∆699/∆699 mouse model (homozygous fixed repressor model), suggesting a dosage effect of GLI3R to be responsible for posterior hand anomalies.15 These findings are supported by Lewandowski et al, who show that the majority of the target genes in GLI signalling are regulated by GLI3R rather than GLI3A.44 Together, these findings suggest a role for the location and type of variant in GLI3-mediated syndromes.Interestingly, the difference between Pallister-Hall syndrome and GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes has also been attributed to the GLI3R overexpression.

However, the difference in phenotype observed in the cases with a truncating variant in the activator domain and Pallister-Hall syndrome suggest different functional consequences. When studying figure 1, it is noted that the included truncating variants on the 3′ side of the cleavage site seldomly affect the CBP binding region, which could provide an explanation for the observed differences. This binding region is included in the Pallister-Hall region as defined by Johnston et al and is necessary for the downstream signalling with GLI1.10 11 23 45 Interestingly, recent reports show that pathogenic variants in GLI1 can produce phenotypes concordant with Ellis von Krefeld syndrome, which includes overlapping features with Pallister-Hall syndrome.46 The four truncating variants observed in this study that do affect the CBP but did not result in a Pallister-Hall phenotype are conflicting with this theory.

Krauss et al postulate an alternative hypothesis, they state that the MID1-α4-PP2A complex, which is essential for GLI3A signalling, could also be the reason for overlapping features of Opitz syndrome, caused by variants in MID1, and Pallister-Hall syndrome. Further analysis is required to fully appreciate the functional differences between truncating mutations that cause Pallister-Hall syndrome and those that result in GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes.For the clinical evaluation of patients with GLI3-mediated polydactyly syndromes, intracranial anomalies are likely the most important to predict based on the variant. Unfortunately, the presence of corpus callosum agenesis was not routinely investigated or reported thus this feature could not be used as an indicator phenotype for LC membership.

Interestingly when using only hand and foot phenotypes, we did notice a higher prevalence of corpus callosum agenesis in patients with posterior phenotypes. The suggested relation between truncating mutations in the activator domain causing these posterior phenotypes and corpus callosum agenesis was statistically confirmed (OR. 8.8, p<0.001).

Functionally this relation could be caused by the GLI3-MED12 interaction at the MBD. Pathogenic DNA variants in MED12 can cause Opitz-Kaveggia syndrome, a syndrome in which presentation includes corpus callosum agenesis, broad halluces and thumbs.47In conclusion, there are two distinct phenotypes within the GLI3-mediated polydactyly population. Patients with more posteriorly and more anteriorly oriented hand anomalies.

Furthermore, this difference is related to the observed variant in GLI3. We hypothesise that variants that cause haploinsufficiency produce anterior anomalies of the hand, whereas variants with abnormal truncation of the activator domain have more posterior anomalies. Furthermore, patients that have a variant that produces abnormal truncation of the activator domain, have a greater risk for corpus callosum agenesis.

Thus, we advocate to differentiate preaxial or postaxial oriented GLI3 phenotypes to explain the pathophysiology as well as to get a risk assessment for corpus callosum agenesis.Data availability statementData are available upon reasonable request.Ethics statementsPatient consent for publicationNot required.Ethics approvalThe research protocol was approved by the local ethics board of the Erasmus MC University Medical Center (MEC 2015-679)..

Is proair hfa the same as ventolin hfa

Abstract Thiamine is essential for the activity of several enzymes associated is proair hfa the same as ventolin hfa Where can you get cialis with energy metabolism in humans. Chronic alcohol use is associated with deficiency of thiamine along with other vitamins through several mechanisms. Several neuropsychiatric syndromes have been associated with thiamine deficiency in the context of is proair hfa the same as ventolin hfa alcohol use disorder including Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome, alcoholic cerebellar syndrome, alcoholic peripheral neuropathy, and possibly, Marchiafava–Bignami syndrome. High-dose thiamine replacement is suggested for these neuropsychiatric syndromes.Keywords.

Alcohol use disorder, alcoholic cerebellar syndrome, alcoholic peripheral neuropathy, Marchiafava–Bignami syndrome, is proair hfa the same as ventolin hfa thiamine, Wernicke–Korsakoff syndromeHow to cite this article:Praharaj SK, Munoli RN, Shenoy S, Udupa ST, Thomas LS. High-dose thiamine strategy in Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome and related thiamine deficiency conditions associated with alcohol use disorder. Indian J Psychiatry 2021;63:121-6How to cite this URL:Praharaj SK, Munoli RN, Shenoy S, Udupa ST, Thomas LS is proair hfa the same as ventolin hfa. High-dose thiamine strategy in Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome and related thiamine deficiency conditions associated with alcohol use disorder.

Indian J Psychiatry [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Jun is proair hfa the same as ventolin hfa 17];63:121-6. Available from. Https://www.indianjpsychiatry.org/text.asp?. 2021/63/2/121/313716 Introduction Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin (B1) that plays a key role in the activity of several enzymes associated with energy metabolism.

Thiamine pyrophosphate (or diphosphate) is the active form that acts as a cofactor for enzymes. The daily dietary requirement of thiamine in adults is 1–2 mg and is dependent on carbohydrate intake.[1],[2] The requirement increases if basal metabolic rate is higher, for example, during alcohol withdrawal state. Dietary sources include pork (being the major source), meat, legume, vegetables, and enriched foods. The body can store between 30 and 50 mg of thiamine and is likely to get depleted within 4–6 weeks if the diet is deficient.[2] In those with alcohol-related liver damage, the ability to store thiamine is gradually reduced.[1],[2]Lower thiamine levels are found in 30%–80% of chronic alcohol users.[3] Thiamine deficiency occurs due to poor intake of vitamin-rich foods, impaired intestinal absorption, decreased storage capacity of liver, damage to the renal epithelial cells due to alcohol, leading to increased loss from the kidneys, and excessive loss associated with medical conditions.[2],[3] Furthermore, alcohol decreases the absorption of colonic bacterial thiamine, reduces the enzymatic activity of thiamine pyrophosphokinase, and thereby, reducing the amount of available thiamine pyrophosphate.[4] Since facilitated diffusion of thiamine into cells is dependent on a concentration gradient, reduced thiamine pyrophosphokinase activity further reduces thiamine uptake into cells.[4] Impaired utilization of thiamine is seen in certain conditions (e.g., hypomagnesemia) which are common in alcohol use disorder.[2],[3],[4] This narrative review discusses the neuropsychiatric syndromes associated with thiamine deficiency in the context of alcohol use disorder, and the treatment regimens advocated for these conditions.

A PubMed search supplemented with manual search was used to identify neuropsychiatric syndromes related to thiamine deficiency in alcohol use disorder patients. Neuropsychiatric Syndromes Associated With Thiamine Deficiency Wernicke–Korsakoff syndromeWernicke encephalopathy is associated with chronic alcohol use, and if not identified and treated early, could lead to permanent brain damage characterized by an amnestic syndrome known as Korsakoff syndrome. Inappropriate treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy with lower doses of thiamine can lead to high mortality rates (~20%) and Korsakoff syndrome in ~ 80% of patients (ranges from 56% to 84%).[5],[6] The classic triad of Wernicke includes oculomotor abnormalities, cerebellar dysfunction, and confusion. Wernicke lesions are found in 12.5% of brain samples of patients with alcohol dependence.[7] However, only 20%–30% of them had a clinical diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy antemortem.

It has been found that many patients develop Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) following repeated subclinical episodes of thiamine deficiency.[7] In an autopsy report of 97 chronic alcohol users, only16% had all the three “classical signs,” 29% had two signs, 37% presented with one sign, and 19% had none.[8] Mental status changes are the most prevalent sign (seen in 82% of the cases), followed by eye signs (in 29%) and ataxia (23%).[8] WKS should be suspected in persons with a history of alcohol use and presenting with signs of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, acute confusion, memory disturbance, unexplained hypotension, hypothermia, coma, or unconsciousness.[9] Operational criteria for the diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy have been proposed by Caine et al.[10] that requires two out of four features, i.e., (a) dietary deficiency (signs such as cheilitis, glossitis, and bleeding gums), (b) oculomotor abnormalities (nystagmus, opthalmoplegia, and diplopia), (c) cerebellar dysfunction (gait ataxia, nystagmus), and (d) either altered mental state (confusion) or mild memory impairment.As it is very difficult to clinically distinguish Wernicke encephalopathy from other associated conditions such as delirium tremens, hepatic encephalopathy, or head injury, it is prudent to have a lower threshold to diagnose this if any of the clinical signs is seen. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scan during Wernicke encephalopathy shows mammillary body atrophy and enlarged third ventricle, lesions in the medial portions of thalami and mid brain and can be used to aid diagnosis.[11],[12] However, most clinical situations warrant treatment without waiting for neuroimaging report. The treatment suggestions in the guidelines vary widely. Furthermore, hardly any evidence-based recommendations exist on a more general use of thiamine as a preventative intervention in individuals with alcohol use disorder.[13] There are very few studies that have evaluated the dose and duration of thiamine for WKS, but higher doses may result in a greater response.[6],[14] With thiamine administration rapid improvement is seen in eye movement abnormalities (improve within days or weeks) and ataxia (may take months to recover), but the effects on memory, in particular, are unclear.[4],[14] Severe memory impairment is the core feature of Korsakoff syndrome.

Initial stages of the disease can present with confabulation, executive dysfunction, flattened affect, apathy, and poor insight.[15] Both the episodic and semantic memory are affected, whereas, procedural memory remains intact.[15]Thomson et al.[6] suggested the following should be treated with thiamine as they are at high risk for developing WKS. (1) all patients with any evidence of chronic alcohol misuse and any of the following. Acute confusion, decreased conscious level, ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, memory disturbance, and hypothermia with hypotension. (2) patients with delirium tremens may often also have Wernicke encephalopathy, therefore, all of these patients should be presumed to have Wernicke encephalopathy and treated, preferably as inpatients.

And (3) all hypoglycemic patients (who are treated with intravenous glucose) with evidence of chronic alcohol ingestion must be given intravenous thiamine immediately because of the risk of acutely precipitating Wernicke encephalopathy.Alcoholic cerebellar syndromeChronic alcohol use is associated with the degeneration of anterior superior vermis, leading to a clinical syndrome characterized by the subacute or chronic onset of gait ataxia and incoordination in legs, with relative sparing of upper limbs, speech, and oculomotor movements.[16] In severe cases, truncal ataxia, mild dysarthria, and incoordination of the upper limb is also found along with gait ataxia. Thiamine deficiency is considered to be the etiological factor,[17],[18] although direct toxic effects of alcohol may also contribute to this syndrome. One-third of patients with chronic use of alcohol have evidence of alcoholic cerebellar degeneration. However, population-based studies estimate prevalence to be 14.6%.[19] The effect of alcohol on the cerebellum is graded with the most severe deficits occurring in alcohol users with the longest duration and highest severity of use.

The diagnosis of cerebellar degeneration is largely clinical. MRI can be used to evaluate for vermian atrophy but is unnecessary.[20] Anterior portions of vermis are affected early, with involvement of posterior vermis and adjacent lateral hemispheres occurring late in the course could be used to differentiate alcoholic cerebellar degeneration from other conditions that cause more diffuse involvement.[21] The severity of cerebellar syndrome is more in the presence of WKS, thus could be related to thiamine deficiency.[22],[23] Therefore, this has been considered as a cerebellar presentation of WKS and should be treated in a similar way.[16] There are anecdotal evidence to suggest improvement in cerebellar syndrome with high-dose thiamine.[24]Alcoholic peripheral neuropathyPeripheral neuropathy is common in alcohol use disorder and is seen in 44% of the users.[25] It has been associated predominantly with thiamine deficiency. However, deficiency of other B vitamins (pyridoxine and cobalamin) and direct toxic effect of alcohol is also implicated.[26] Clinically, onset of symptoms is gradual with the involvement of both sensory and motor fibers and occasionally autonomic fibers. Neuropathy can affect both small and large peripheral nerve fibers, leading to different clinical manifestations.

Thiamine deficiency-related neuropathy affects larger fiber types, which results in motor deficits and sensory ataxia. On examination, large fiber involvement is manifested by distal limb muscle weakness and loss of proprioception and vibratory sensation. Together, these can contribute to the gait unsteadiness seen in chronic alcohol users by creating a superimposed steppage gait and reduced proprioceptive input back to the movement control loops in the central nervous system. The most common presentations include painful sensations in both lower limbs, sometimes with burning sensation or numbness, which are early symptoms.

Typically, there is a loss of vibration sensation in distal lower limbs. Later symptoms include loss of proprioception, gait disturbance, and loss of reflexes. Most advanced findings include weakness and muscle atrophy.[20] Progression is very gradual over months and involvement of upper limbs may occur late in the course. Diagnosis begins with laboratory evaluation to exclude other causes of distal, sensorimotor neuropathy including hemoglobin A1c, liver function tests, and complete blood count to evaluate for red blood cell macrocytosis.

Cerebrospinal fluid studies may show increased protein levels but should otherwise be normal in cases of alcohol neuropathy and are not recommended in routine evaluation. Electromyography and nerve conduction studies can be used to distinguish whether the neuropathy is axonal or demyelinating and whether it is motor, sensory, or mixed type. Alcoholic neuropathy shows reduced distal, sensory amplitudes, and to a lesser extent, reduced motor amplitudes on nerve conduction studies.[20] Abstinence and vitamin supplementation including thiamine are the treatments advocated for this condition.[25] In mild-to-moderate cases, near-complete improvement can be achieved.[20] Randomized controlled trials have showed a significant improvement in alcoholic polyneuropathy with thiamine treatment.[27],[28]Marchiafava–Bignami syndromeThis is a rare but fatal condition seen in chronic alcohol users that is characterized by progressive demyelination and necrosis of the corpus callosum. The association of this syndrome with thiamine deficiency is not very clear, and direct toxic effects of alcohol are also suggested.[29] The clinical syndrome is variable and presentation can be acute, subacute, or chronic.

In acute forms, it is predominantly characterized by the altered mental state such as delirium, stupor, or coma.[30] Other clinical features in neuroimaging confirmed Marchiafava–Bignami syndrome (MBS) cases include impaired gait, dysarthria, mutism, signs of split-brain syndrome, pyramidal tract signs, primitive reflexes, rigidity, incontinence, gaze palsy, diplopia, and sensory symptoms.[30] Neuropsychiatric manifestations are common and include psychotic symptoms, depression, apathy, aggressive behavior, and sometimes dementia.[29] MRI scan shows lesions of the corpus callosum, particularly splenium. Treatment for this condition is mostly supportive and use of nutritional supplements and steroids. However, there are several reports of improvement of this syndrome with thiamine at variable doses including reports of beneficial effects with high-dose strategy.[29],[30],[31] Early initiation of thiamine, preferably within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms is associated with a better outcome. Therefore, high-dose thiamine should be administered to all suspected cases of MBS.

Laboratory Diagnosis of Thiamine Deficiency Estimation of thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate levels may confirm the diagnosis of deficiency. Levels of thiamine in the blood are not reliable indicators of thiamine status. Low erythrocyte transketolase activity is also helpful.[32],[33] Transketolase concentrations of <120 nmol/L have also been used to indicate deficiency, while concentrations of 120–150 nmol/L suggest marginal thiamine status.[1] However, these tests are not routinely performed as it is time consuming, expensive, and may not be readily available.[34] The ETKA assay is a functional test rather than a direct measurement of thiamin status and therefore may be influenced by factors other than thiamine deficiency such as diabetes mellitus and polyneuritis.[1] Hence, treatment should be initiated in the absence of laboratory confirmation of thiamine deficiency. Furthermore, treatment should not be delayed if tests are ordered, but the results are awaited.

Electroencephalographic abnormalities in thiamine deficiency states range from diffuse mild-to-moderate slow waves and are not a good diagnostic option, as the prevalence of abnormalities among patients is inconsistent.[35]Surrogate markers, which reflect chronic alcohol use and nutritional deficiency other than thiamine, may be helpful in identifying at-risk patients. This includes gamma glutamate transferase, aspartate aminotransferase. Alanine transaminase ratio >2:1, and increased mean corpuscular volume.[36] They are useful when a reliable history of alcohol use is not readily available, specifically in emergency departments when treatment needs to be started immediately to avoid long-term consequences. Thiamine Replacement Therapy Oral versus parenteral thiamineIntestinal absorption of thiamine depends on active transport through thiamine transporter 1 and 2, which follow saturation kinetics.[1] Therefore, the rate and amount of absorption of thiamine in healthy individuals is limited.

In healthy volunteers, a 10 mg dose results in maximal absorption of thiamine, and any doses higher than this do not increase thiamine levels. Therefore, the maximum amount of thiamine absorbed from 10 mg or higher dose is between 4.3 and 5.6 mg.[37] However, it has been suggested that, although thiamine transport occurs through the energy-requiring, sodium-dependent active process at physiologic concentrations, at higher supraphysiologic concentrations thiamine uptake is mostly a passive process.[38] Smithline et al. Have demonstrated that it is possible to achieve higher serum thiamine levels with oral doses up to 1500 mg.[39]In chronic alcohol users, intestinal absorption is impaired. Hence, absorption rates are expected to be much lower.

It is approximately 30% of that seen in healthy individuals, i.e., 1.5 mg of thiamine is absorbed from 10 mg oral thiamine.[3] In those consuming alcohol and have poor nutrition, not more than 0.8 mg of thiamine is absorbed.[2],[3],[6] The daily thiamine requirement is 1–1.6 mg/day, which may be more in alcohol-dependent patients at risk for Wernicke encephalopathy.[1] It is highly likely that oral supplementation with thiamine will be inadequate in alcohol-dependent individuals who continue to drink. Therefore, parenteral thiamine is preferred for supplementation in deficiency states associated with chronic alcohol use. Therapy involving parenteral thiamine is considered safe except for occasional circumstances of allergic reactions involving pruritus and local irritation.There is a small, but definite risk of anaphylaxis with parenteral thiamine, specifically with intravenous administration (1/250,000 intravenous injections).[40] Diluting thiamine in 50–100 mg normal saline for infusion may reduce the risk. However, parenteral thiamine should always be administered under observation with the necessary facilities for resuscitation.A further important issue involves the timing of administration of thiamine relative to the course of alcohol abuse or dependence.

Administration of thiamine treatment to patients experiencing alcohol withdrawal may also be influenced by other factors such as magnesium depletion, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor upregulation, or liver impairment, all of which may alter thiamine metabolism and utilization.[6],[14]Thiamine or other preparations (e.g., benfotiamine)The thiamine transporters limit the rate of absorption of orally administered thiamine. Allithiamines (e.g., benfotiamine) are the lipid-soluble thiamine derivatives that are absorbed better, result in higher thiamine levels, and are retained longer in the body.[41] The thiamine levels with orally administered benfotiamine are much higher than oral thiamine and almost equals to intravenous thiamine given at the same dosage.[42]Benfotiamine has other beneficial effects including inhibition of production of advanced glycation end products, thus protecting against diabetic vascular complications.[41] It also modulates nuclear transcription factor κB (NK-κB), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, glycogen synthase kinase 3 β, etc., that play a role in cell repair and survival.[41] Benfotiamine has been found to be effective for the treatment of alcoholic peripheral neuropathy.[27]Dosing of thiamineAs the prevalence of thiamine deficiency is very common in chronic alcohol users, the requirement of thiamine increases in active drinkers and it is difficult to rapidly determine thiamine levels using laboratory tests, it is prudent that all patients irrespective of nutritional status should be administered parenteral thiamine. The dose should be 100 mg thiamine daily for 3–5 days during inpatient treatment. Commonly, multivitamin injections are added to intravenous infusions.

Patients at risk for thiamine deficiency should receive 250 mg of thiamine daily intramuscularly for 3–5 days, followed by oral thiamine 100 mg daily.[6]Thiamine plasma levels reduce to 20% of peak value after approximately 2 h of parenteral administration, thus reducing the effective “window period” for passive diffusion to the central nervous system.[6] Therefore, in thiamine deficient individuals with features of Wernicke encephalopathy should receive thiamine thrice daily.High-dose parenteral thiamine administered thrice daily has been advocated in patients at risk for Wernicke encephalopathy.[43] The Royal College of Physicians guideline recommends that patients with suspected Wernicke encephalopathy should receive 500 mg thiamine diluted in 50–100 ml of normal saline infusion over 30 min three times daily for 2–3 days and sometimes for longer periods.[13] If there are persistent symptoms such as confusion, cerebellar symptoms, or memory impairment, this regimen can be continued until the symptoms improve. If symptoms improve, oral thiamine 100 mg thrice daily can be continued for prolonged periods.[6],[40] A similar treatment regimen is advocated for alcoholic cerebellar degeneration as well. Doses more than 500 mg intramuscular or intravenous three times a day for 3–5 days, followed by 250 mg once daily for a further 3–5 days is also recommended by some guidelines (e.g., British Association for Psychopharmacology).[44]Other effects of thiamineThere are some data to suggest that thiamine deficiency can modulate alcohol consumption and may result in pathological drinking. Benfotiamine 600 mg/day as compared to placebo for 6 months was well tolerated and found to decrease psychiatric distress in males and reduce alcohol consumption in females with severe alcohol dependence.[45],[46] Other Factors During Thiamine Therapy Correction of hypomagnesemiaMagnesium is a cofactor for many thiamine-dependent enzymes in carbohydrate metabolism.

Patients may fail to respond to thiamine supplementation in the presence of hypomagnesemia.[47] Magnesium deficiency is common in chronic alcohol users and is seen in 30% of individuals.[48],[49] It can occur because of increased renal excretion of magnesium, poor intake, decreased absorption because of Vitamin D deficiency, the formation of undissociated magnesium soaps with free fatty acids.[48],[49]The usual adult dose is 35–50 mmol of magnesium sulfate added to 1 L isotonic (saline) given over 12–24 h.[6] The dose has to be titrated against plasma magnesium levels. It is recommended to reduce the dose in renal failure. Contraindications include patients with documented hypersensitivity and those with heart block, Addison's disease, myocardial damage, severe hepatitis, or hypophosphatemia. Do not administer intravenous magnesium unless hypomagnesemia is confirmed.[6]Other B-complex vitaminsMost patients with deficiency of thiamine will also have reduced levels of other B vitamins including niacin, pyridoxine, and cobalamin that require replenishment.

For patients admitted to the intensive care unit with symptoms that may mimic or mask Wernicke encephalopathy, based on the published literature, routine supplementation during the 1st day of admission includes 200–500 mg intravenous thiamine every 8 h, 64 mg/kg magnesium sulfate (≈4–5 g for most adult patients), and 400–1000 μg intravenous folate.[50] If alcoholic ketoacidosis is suspected, dextrose-containing fluids are recommended over normal saline.[50] Precautions to be Taken When Administering Parenteral Thiamine It is recommended to monitor for anaphylaxis and has appropriate facilities for resuscitation and for treating anaphylaxis readily available including adrenaline and corticosteroids. Anaphylaxis has been reported at the rate of approximately 4/1 million pairs of ampoules of Pabrinex (a pair of high potency vitamins available in the UK containing 500 mg of thiamine (1:250,000 I/V administrations).[40] Intramuscular thiamine is reported to have a lower incidence of anaphylactic reactions than intravenous administration.[40] The reaction has been attributed to nonspecific histamine release.[51] Administer intravenous thiamine slowly, preferably by slow infusion in 100 ml normal saline over 15–30 min. Conclusions Risk factors for thiamine deficiency should be assessed in chronic alcohol users. A high index of suspicion and a lower threshold to diagnose thiamine deficiency states including Wernicke encephalopathy is needed.

Several other presentations such as cerebellar syndrome, MBS, polyneuropathy, and delirium tremens could be related to thiamine deficiency and should be treated with protocols similar to Wernicke encephalopathy. High-dose thiamine is recommended for the treatment of suspected Wernicke encephalopathy and related conditions [Figure 1]. However, evidence in terms of randomized controlled trials is lacking, and the recommendations are based on small studies and anecdotal reports. Nevertheless, as all these conditions respond to thiamine supplementation, it is possible that these have overlapping pathophysiology and are better considered as Wernicke encephalopathy spectrum disorders.Figure 1.

Thiamine recommendations for patients with alcohol use disorder. AHistory of alcohol use, but no clinical features of WE. BNo clinical features of WE, but with risk factors such as complicated withdrawal (delirium, seizures). CClinical features of WE (ataxia, opthalmoplegia, global confusion)Click here to viewFinancial support and sponsorshipNil.Conflicts of interestThere are no conflicts of interest.

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Neuroimaging of Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's syndrome. Neuropsychol Rev 2012;22:170-80. 13.Pruckner N, Baumgartner J, Hinterbuchinger B, Glahn A, Vyssoki S, Vyssoki B. Thiamine substitution in alcohol use disorder.

A narrative review of medical guidelines. Eur Addict Res 2019;25:103-10. 14.Day E, Bentham PW, Callaghan R, Kuruvilla T, George S. Thiamine for prevention and treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome in people who abuse alcohol.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2013;7:CD004033. Doi. 10.1002/14651858.CD004033.pub3. 15.Arts NJ, Walvoort SJ, Kessels RP.

Korsakoff's syndrome. A critical review. Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat 2017;13:2875-90. 16.Laureno R.

Nutritional cerebellar degeneration, with comments on its relationship to Wernicke disease and alcoholism. Handb Clin Neurol 2012;103:175-87. 17.Maschke M, Weber J, Bonnet U, Dimitrova A, Bohrenkämper J, Sturm S, et al. Vermal atrophy of alcoholics correlate with serum thiamine levels but not with dentate iron concentrations as estimated by MRI.

J Neurol 2005;252:704-11. 18.Mulholland PJ, Self RL, Stepanyan TD, Little HJ, Littleton JM, Prendergast MA. Thiamine deficiency in the pathogenesis of chronic ethanol-associated cerebellar damage in vitro. Neuroscience 2005;135:1129-39.

19.Del Brutto OH, Mera RM, Sullivan LJ, Zambrano M, King NR. Population-based study of alcoholic cerebellar degeneration. The Atahualpa Project. J Neurol Sci 2016;367:356-60.

20.Hammoud N, Jimenez-Shahed J. Chronic neurologic effects of alcohol. Clin Liver Dis 2019;23:141-55. 21.Lee JH, Heo SH, Chang DI.

Early-stage alcoholic cerebellar degeneration. Diagnostic imaging clues. J Korean Med Sci 2015;30:1539. 22.Phillips SC, Harper CG, Kril JJ.

The contribution of Wernicke's encephalopathy to alcohol-related cerebellar damage. Drug Alcohol Rev 1990;9:53-60. 23.Baker KG, Harding AJ, Halliday GM, Kril JJ, Harper CG. Neuronal loss in functional zones of the cerebellum of chronic alcoholics with and without Wernicke's encephalopathy.

Neuroscience 1999;91:429-38. 24.Graham JR, Woodhouse D, Read FH. Massive thiamine dosage in an alcoholic with cerebellar cortical degeneration. Lancet 1971;2:107.

25.Julian T, Glascow N, Syeed R, Zis P. Alcohol-related peripheral neuropathy. A systematic review and meta-analysis. J Neurol 2018;22:1-3.

26.Chopra K, Tiwari V. Alcoholic neuropathy. Possible mechanisms and future treatment possibilities. Br J Clin Pharmacol 2012;73:348-62.

27.Woelk H, Lehrl S, Bitsch R, Köpcke W. Benfotiamine in treatment of alcoholic polyneuropathy. An 8-week randomized controlled study (BAP I Study). Alcohol Alcohol 1998;33:631-8.

28.Peters TJ, Kotowicz J, Nyka W, Kozubski W, Kuznetsov V, Vanderbist F, et al. Treatment of alcoholic polyneuropathy with vitamin B complex. A randomised controlled trial. Alcohol Alcohol 2006;41:636-42.

29.Fernandes LM, Bezerra FR, Monteiro MC, Silva ML, de Oliveira FR, Lima RR, et al. Thiamine deficiency, oxidative metabolic pathways and ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. How poor nutrition contributes to the alcoholic syndrome, as Marchiafava-Bignami disease. Eur J Clin Nutr 2017;71:580-6.

30.Hillbom M, Saloheimo P, Fujioka S, Wszolek ZK, Juvela S, Leone MA. Diagnosis and management of Marchiafava-Bignami disease. A review of CT/MRI confirmed cases. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2014;85:168-73.

31.Nemlekar SS, Mehta RY, Dave KR, Shah ND. Marchiafava. Bignami disease treated with parenteral thiamine. Indian J Psychol Med 2016;38:147-9.

[Full text] 32.Brin M. Erythrocyte transketolase in early thiamine deficiency. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1962;98:528-41. 33.Dreyfus PM.

Clinical application of blood transketolase determinations. N Engl J Med 1962;267:596-8. 34.Edwards KA, Tu-Maung N, Cheng K, Wang B, Baeumner AJ, Kraft CE. Thiamine assays – Advances, challenges, and caveats.

ChemistryOpen 2017;6:178-91. 35.Chandrakumar A, Bhardwaj A, 't Jong GW. Review of thiamine deficiency disorders. Wernicke encephalopathy and Korsakoff psychosis.

J Basic Clin Physiol Pharmacol 2018;30:153-62. 36.Torruellas C, French SW, Medici V. Diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease. World J Gastroenterol 2014;20:11684-99.

37.Thomson AD, Leevy CM. Observations on the mechanism of thiamine hydrochloride absorption in man. Clin Sci 1972;43:153-63. 38.Hoyumpa AM Jr., Strickland R, Sheehan JJ, Yarborough G, Nichols S.

Dual system of intestinal thiamine transport in humans. J Lab Clin Med 1982;99:701-8. 39.Smithline HA, Donnino M, Greenblatt DJ. Pharmacokinetics of high-dose oral thiamine hydrochloride in healthy subjects.

BMC Clin Pharmacol 2012;12:4. 40.Latt N, Dore G. Thiamine in the treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy in patients with alcohol use disorders. Intern Med J 2014;44:911-5.

41.Raj V, Ojha S, Howarth FC, Belur PD, Subramanya SB. Therapeutic potential of benfotiamine and its molecular targets. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci 2018;22:3261-73. 42.Xie F, Cheng Z, Li S, Liu X, Guo X, Yu P, et al.

Pharmacokinetic study of benfotiamine and the bioavailability assessment compared to thiamine hydrochloride. J Clin Pharmacol 2014;54:688-95. 43.Cook CC, Hallwood PM, Thomson AD. B Vitamin deficiency and neuropsychiatric syndromes in alcohol misuse.

Alcohol Alcohol 1998;33:317-36. 44.Lingford-Hughes AR, Welch S, Peters L, Nutt DJ, British Association for Psychopharmacology, Expert Reviewers Group. BAP updated guidelines. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of substance abuse, harmful use, addiction and comorbidity.

Recommendations from BAP. J Psychopharmacol 2012;26:899-952. 45.Manzardo AM, He J, Poje A, Penick EC, Campbell J, Butler MG. Double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial of benfotiamine for severe alcohol dependence.

Drug Alcohol Depend 2013;133:562-70. 46.Manzardo AM, Pendleton T, Poje A, Penick EC, Butler MG. Change in psychiatric symptomatology after benfotiamine treatment in males is related to lifetime alcoholism severity. Drug Alcohol Depend 2015;152:257-63.

47.Dingwall KM, Delima JF, Gent D, Batey RG. Hypomagnesaemia and its potential impact on thiamine utilisation in patients with alcohol misuse at the Alice Springs Hospital. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015;34:323-8. 48.Flink EB.

Magnesium deficiency in alcoholism. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1986;10:590-4. 49.Grochowski C, Blicharska E, Baj J, Mierzwińska A, Brzozowska K, Forma A, et al. Serum iron, magnesium, copper, and manganese levels in alcoholism.

A systematic review. Molecules 2019;24:E1361. 50.Flannery AH, Adkins DA, Cook AM. Unpeeling the evidence for the banana bag.

Evidence-based recommendations for the management of alcohol-associated vitamin and electrolyte deficiencies in the ICU. Crit Care Med 2016;44:1545-52. 51.Lagunoff D, Martin TW, Read G. Agents that release histamine from mast cells.

Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol 1983;23:331-51. Correspondence Address:Samir Kumar PraharajDepartment of Psychiatry, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka IndiaSource of Support. None, Conflict of Interest. NoneDOI.

10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_440_20 Figures [Figure 1].

Abstract Thiamine is essential who can buy ventolin online for the activity of several enzymes associated with energy metabolism in humans. Chronic alcohol use is associated with deficiency of thiamine along with other vitamins through several mechanisms. Several neuropsychiatric syndromes have been associated with thiamine deficiency in the context of alcohol use disorder including Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome, alcoholic cerebellar syndrome, alcoholic peripheral who can buy ventolin online neuropathy, and possibly, Marchiafava–Bignami syndrome. High-dose thiamine replacement is suggested for these neuropsychiatric syndromes.Keywords. Alcohol use disorder, alcoholic cerebellar who can buy ventolin online syndrome, alcoholic peripheral neuropathy, Marchiafava–Bignami syndrome, thiamine, Wernicke–Korsakoff syndromeHow to cite this article:Praharaj SK, Munoli RN, Shenoy S, Udupa ST, Thomas LS.

High-dose thiamine strategy in Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome and related thiamine deficiency conditions associated with alcohol use disorder. Indian J Psychiatry 2021;63:121-6How to cite this URL:Praharaj SK, Munoli RN, Shenoy S, Udupa ST, who can buy ventolin online Thomas LS. High-dose thiamine strategy in Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome and related thiamine deficiency conditions associated with alcohol use disorder. Indian J Psychiatry [serial online] 2021 who can buy ventolin online [cited 2021 Jun 17];63:121-6. Available from.

Https://www.indianjpsychiatry.org/text.asp?. 2021/63/2/121/313716 Introduction Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin (B1) that plays a key role in the activity of several enzymes associated with energy metabolism. Thiamine pyrophosphate (or diphosphate) is the active form that acts as a cofactor for enzymes. The daily dietary requirement of thiamine in adults is 1–2 mg and is dependent on carbohydrate intake.[1],[2] The requirement increases if basal metabolic rate is higher, for example, during alcohol withdrawal state. Dietary sources include pork (being the major source), meat, legume, vegetables, and enriched foods.

The body can store between 30 and 50 mg of thiamine and is likely to get depleted within 4–6 weeks if the diet is deficient.[2] In those with alcohol-related liver damage, the ability to store thiamine is gradually reduced.[1],[2]Lower thiamine levels are found in 30%–80% of chronic alcohol users.[3] Thiamine deficiency occurs due to poor intake of vitamin-rich foods, impaired intestinal absorption, decreased storage capacity of liver, damage to the renal epithelial cells due to alcohol, leading to increased loss from the kidneys, and excessive loss associated with medical conditions.[2],[3] Furthermore, alcohol decreases the absorption of colonic bacterial thiamine, reduces the enzymatic activity of thiamine pyrophosphokinase, and thereby, reducing the amount of available thiamine pyrophosphate.[4] Since facilitated diffusion of thiamine into cells is dependent on a concentration gradient, reduced thiamine pyrophosphokinase activity further reduces thiamine uptake into cells.[4] Impaired utilization of thiamine is seen in certain conditions (e.g., hypomagnesemia) which are common in alcohol use disorder.[2],[3],[4] This narrative review discusses the neuropsychiatric syndromes associated with thiamine deficiency in the context of alcohol use disorder, and the treatment regimens advocated for these conditions. A PubMed search supplemented with manual search was used to identify neuropsychiatric syndromes related to thiamine deficiency in alcohol use disorder patients. Neuropsychiatric Syndromes Associated With Thiamine Deficiency Wernicke–Korsakoff syndromeWernicke encephalopathy is associated with chronic alcohol use, and if not identified and treated early, could lead to permanent brain damage characterized by an amnestic syndrome known as Korsakoff syndrome. Inappropriate treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy with lower doses of thiamine can lead to high mortality rates (~20%) and Korsakoff syndrome in ~ 80% of patients (ranges from 56% to 84%).[5],[6] The classic triad of Wernicke includes oculomotor abnormalities, cerebellar dysfunction, and confusion. Wernicke lesions are found in 12.5% of brain samples of patients with alcohol dependence.[7] However, only 20%–30% of them had a clinical diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy antemortem.

It has been found that many patients develop Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) following repeated subclinical episodes of thiamine deficiency.[7] In an autopsy report of 97 chronic alcohol users, only16% had all the three “classical signs,” 29% had two signs, 37% presented with one sign, and 19% had none.[8] Mental status changes are the most prevalent sign (seen in 82% of the cases), followed by eye signs (in 29%) and ataxia (23%).[8] WKS should be suspected in persons with a history of alcohol use and presenting with signs of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, acute confusion, memory disturbance, unexplained hypotension, hypothermia, coma, or unconsciousness.[9] Operational criteria for the diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy have been proposed by Caine et al.[10] that requires two out of four features, i.e., (a) dietary deficiency (signs such as cheilitis, glossitis, and bleeding gums), (b) oculomotor abnormalities (nystagmus, opthalmoplegia, and diplopia), (c) cerebellar dysfunction (gait ataxia, nystagmus), and (d) either altered mental state (confusion) or mild memory impairment.As it is very difficult to clinically distinguish Wernicke encephalopathy from other associated conditions such as delirium tremens, hepatic encephalopathy, or head injury, it is prudent to have a lower threshold to diagnose this if any of the clinical signs is seen. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scan during Wernicke encephalopathy shows mammillary body atrophy and enlarged third ventricle, lesions in the medial portions of thalami and mid brain and can be used to aid diagnosis.[11],[12] However, most clinical situations warrant treatment without waiting for neuroimaging report. The treatment suggestions in the guidelines vary widely. Furthermore, hardly any evidence-based recommendations exist on a more general use of thiamine as a preventative intervention in individuals with alcohol use disorder.[13] There are very few studies that have evaluated the dose and duration of thiamine for WKS, but higher doses may result in a greater response.[6],[14] With thiamine administration rapid improvement is seen in eye movement abnormalities (improve within days or weeks) and ataxia (may take months to recover), but the effects on memory, in particular, are unclear.[4],[14] Severe memory impairment is the core feature of Korsakoff syndrome. Initial stages of the disease can present with confabulation, executive dysfunction, flattened affect, apathy, and poor insight.[15] Both the episodic and semantic memory are affected, whereas, procedural memory remains intact.[15]Thomson et al.[6] suggested the following should be treated with thiamine as they are at high risk for developing WKS.

(1) all patients with any evidence of chronic alcohol misuse and any of the following. Acute confusion, decreased conscious level, ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, memory disturbance, and hypothermia with hypotension. (2) patients with delirium tremens may often also have Wernicke encephalopathy, therefore, all of these patients should be presumed to have Wernicke encephalopathy and treated, preferably as inpatients. And (3) all hypoglycemic patients (who are treated with intravenous glucose) with evidence of chronic alcohol ingestion must be given intravenous thiamine immediately because of the risk of acutely precipitating Wernicke encephalopathy.Alcoholic cerebellar syndromeChronic alcohol use is associated with the degeneration of anterior superior vermis, leading to a clinical syndrome characterized by the subacute or chronic onset of gait ataxia and incoordination in legs, with relative sparing of upper limbs, speech, and oculomotor movements.[16] In severe cases, truncal ataxia, mild dysarthria, and incoordination of the upper limb is also found along with gait ataxia. Thiamine deficiency is considered to be the etiological factor,[17],[18] although direct toxic effects of alcohol may also contribute to this syndrome.

One-third of patients with chronic use of alcohol have evidence of alcoholic cerebellar degeneration. However, population-based studies estimate prevalence to be 14.6%.[19] The effect of alcohol on the cerebellum is graded with the most severe deficits occurring in alcohol users with the longest duration and highest severity of use. The diagnosis of cerebellar degeneration is largely clinical. MRI can be used to evaluate for vermian atrophy but is unnecessary.[20] Anterior portions of vermis are affected early, with involvement of posterior vermis and adjacent lateral hemispheres occurring late in the course could be used to differentiate alcoholic cerebellar degeneration from other conditions that cause more diffuse involvement.[21] The severity of cerebellar syndrome is more in the presence of WKS, thus could be related to thiamine deficiency.[22],[23] Therefore, this has been considered as a cerebellar presentation of WKS and should be treated in a similar way.[16] There are anecdotal evidence to suggest improvement in cerebellar syndrome with high-dose thiamine.[24]Alcoholic peripheral neuropathyPeripheral neuropathy is common in alcohol use disorder and is seen in 44% of the users.[25] It has been associated predominantly with thiamine deficiency. However, deficiency of other B vitamins (pyridoxine and cobalamin) and direct toxic effect of alcohol is also implicated.[26] Clinically, onset of symptoms is gradual with the involvement of both sensory and motor fibers and occasionally autonomic fibers.

Neuropathy can affect both small and large peripheral nerve fibers, leading to different clinical manifestations. Thiamine deficiency-related neuropathy affects larger fiber types, which results in motor deficits and sensory ataxia. On examination, large fiber involvement is manifested by distal limb muscle weakness and loss of proprioception and vibratory sensation. Together, these can contribute to the gait unsteadiness seen in chronic alcohol users by creating a superimposed steppage gait and reduced proprioceptive input back to the movement control loops in the central nervous system. The most common presentations include painful sensations in both lower limbs, sometimes with burning sensation or numbness, which are early symptoms.

Typically, there is a loss of vibration sensation in distal lower limbs. Later symptoms include loss of proprioception, gait disturbance, and loss of reflexes. Most advanced findings include weakness and muscle atrophy.[20] Progression is very gradual over months and involvement of upper limbs may occur late in the course. Diagnosis begins with laboratory evaluation to exclude other causes of distal, sensorimotor neuropathy including hemoglobin A1c, liver function tests, and complete blood count to evaluate for red blood cell macrocytosis. Cerebrospinal fluid studies may show increased protein levels but should otherwise be normal in cases of alcohol neuropathy and are not recommended in routine evaluation.

Electromyography and nerve conduction studies can be used to distinguish whether the neuropathy is axonal or demyelinating and whether it is motor, sensory, or mixed type. Alcoholic neuropathy shows reduced distal, sensory amplitudes, and to a lesser extent, reduced motor amplitudes on nerve conduction studies.[20] Abstinence and vitamin supplementation including thiamine are the treatments advocated for this condition.[25] In mild-to-moderate cases, near-complete improvement can be achieved.[20] Randomized controlled trials have showed a significant improvement in alcoholic polyneuropathy with thiamine treatment.[27],[28]Marchiafava–Bignami syndromeThis is a rare but fatal condition seen in chronic alcohol users that is characterized by progressive demyelination and necrosis of the corpus callosum. The association of this syndrome with thiamine deficiency is not very clear, and direct toxic effects of alcohol are also suggested.[29] The clinical syndrome is variable and presentation can be acute, subacute, or chronic. In acute forms, it is predominantly characterized by the altered mental state such as delirium, stupor, or coma.[30] Other clinical features in neuroimaging confirmed Marchiafava–Bignami syndrome (MBS) cases include impaired gait, dysarthria, mutism, signs of split-brain syndrome, pyramidal tract signs, primitive reflexes, rigidity, incontinence, gaze palsy, diplopia, and sensory symptoms.[30] Neuropsychiatric manifestations are common and include psychotic symptoms, depression, apathy, aggressive behavior, and sometimes dementia.[29] MRI scan shows lesions of the corpus callosum, particularly splenium. Treatment for this condition is mostly supportive and use of nutritional supplements and steroids.

However, there are several reports of improvement of this syndrome with thiamine at variable doses including reports of beneficial effects with high-dose strategy.[29],[30],[31] Early initiation of thiamine, preferably within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms is associated with a better outcome. Therefore, high-dose thiamine should be administered to all suspected cases of MBS. Laboratory Diagnosis of Thiamine Deficiency Estimation of thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate levels may confirm the diagnosis of deficiency. Levels of thiamine in the blood are not reliable indicators of thiamine status. Low erythrocyte transketolase activity is also helpful.[32],[33] Transketolase concentrations of <120 nmol/L have also been used to indicate deficiency, while concentrations of 120–150 nmol/L suggest marginal thiamine status.[1] However, these tests are not routinely performed as it is time consuming, expensive, and may not be readily available.[34] The ETKA assay is a functional test rather than a direct measurement of thiamin status and therefore may be influenced by factors other than thiamine deficiency such as diabetes mellitus and polyneuritis.[1] Hence, treatment should be initiated in the absence of laboratory confirmation of thiamine deficiency.

Furthermore, treatment should not be delayed if tests are ordered, but the results are awaited. Electroencephalographic abnormalities in thiamine deficiency states range from diffuse mild-to-moderate slow waves and are not a good diagnostic option, as the prevalence of abnormalities among patients is inconsistent.[35]Surrogate markers, which reflect chronic alcohol use and nutritional deficiency other than thiamine, may be helpful in identifying at-risk patients. This includes gamma glutamate transferase, aspartate aminotransferase. Alanine transaminase ratio >2:1, and increased mean corpuscular volume.[36] They are useful when a reliable history of alcohol use is not readily available, specifically in emergency departments when treatment needs to be started immediately to avoid long-term consequences. Thiamine Replacement Therapy Oral versus parenteral thiamineIntestinal absorption of thiamine depends on active transport through thiamine transporter 1 and 2, which follow saturation kinetics.[1] Therefore, the rate and amount of absorption of thiamine in healthy individuals is limited.

In healthy volunteers, a 10 mg dose results in maximal absorption of thiamine, and any doses higher than this do not increase thiamine levels. Therefore, the maximum amount of thiamine absorbed from 10 mg or higher dose is between 4.3 and 5.6 mg.[37] However, it has been suggested that, although thiamine transport occurs through the energy-requiring, sodium-dependent active process at physiologic concentrations, at higher supraphysiologic concentrations thiamine uptake is mostly a passive process.[38] Smithline et al. Have demonstrated that it is possible to achieve higher serum thiamine levels with oral doses up to 1500 mg.[39]In chronic alcohol users, intestinal absorption is impaired. Hence, absorption rates are expected to be much lower. It is approximately 30% of that seen in healthy individuals, i.e., 1.5 mg of thiamine is absorbed from 10 mg oral thiamine.[3] In those consuming alcohol and have poor nutrition, not more than 0.8 mg of thiamine is absorbed.[2],[3],[6] The daily thiamine requirement is 1–1.6 mg/day, which may be more in alcohol-dependent patients at risk for Wernicke encephalopathy.[1] It is highly likely that oral supplementation with thiamine will be inadequate in alcohol-dependent individuals who continue to drink.

Therefore, parenteral thiamine is preferred for supplementation in deficiency states associated with chronic alcohol use. Therapy involving parenteral thiamine is considered safe except for occasional circumstances of allergic reactions involving pruritus and local irritation.There is a small, but definite risk of anaphylaxis with parenteral thiamine, specifically with intravenous administration (1/250,000 intravenous injections).[40] Diluting thiamine in 50–100 mg normal saline for infusion may reduce the risk. However, parenteral thiamine should always be administered under observation with the necessary facilities for resuscitation.A further important issue involves the timing of administration of thiamine relative to the course of alcohol abuse or dependence. Administration of thiamine treatment to patients experiencing alcohol withdrawal may also be influenced by other factors such as magnesium depletion, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor upregulation, or liver impairment, all of which may alter thiamine metabolism and utilization.[6],[14]Thiamine or other preparations (e.g., benfotiamine)The thiamine transporters limit the rate of absorption of orally administered thiamine. Allithiamines (e.g., benfotiamine) are the lipid-soluble thiamine derivatives that are absorbed better, result in higher thiamine levels, and are retained longer in the body.[41] The thiamine levels with orally administered benfotiamine are much higher than oral thiamine and almost equals to intravenous thiamine given at the same dosage.[42]Benfotiamine has other beneficial effects including inhibition of production of advanced glycation end products, thus protecting against diabetic vascular complications.[41] It also modulates nuclear transcription factor κB (NK-κB), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, glycogen synthase kinase 3 β, etc., that play a role in cell repair and survival.[41] Benfotiamine has been found to be effective for the treatment of alcoholic peripheral neuropathy.[27]Dosing of thiamineAs the prevalence of thiamine deficiency is very common in chronic alcohol users, the requirement of thiamine increases in active drinkers and it is difficult to rapidly determine thiamine levels using laboratory tests, it is prudent that all patients irrespective of nutritional status should be administered parenteral thiamine.

The dose should be 100 mg thiamine daily for 3–5 days during inpatient treatment. Commonly, multivitamin injections are added to intravenous infusions. Patients at risk for thiamine deficiency should receive 250 mg of thiamine daily intramuscularly for 3–5 days, followed by oral thiamine 100 mg daily.[6]Thiamine plasma levels reduce to 20% of peak value after approximately 2 h of parenteral administration, thus reducing the effective “window period” for passive diffusion to the central nervous system.[6] Therefore, in thiamine deficient individuals with features of Wernicke encephalopathy should receive thiamine thrice daily.High-dose parenteral thiamine administered thrice daily has been advocated in patients at risk for Wernicke encephalopathy.[43] The Royal College of Physicians guideline recommends that patients with suspected Wernicke encephalopathy should receive 500 mg thiamine diluted in 50–100 ml of normal saline infusion over 30 min three times daily for 2–3 days and sometimes for longer periods.[13] If there are persistent symptoms such as confusion, cerebellar symptoms, or memory impairment, this regimen can be continued until the symptoms improve. If symptoms improve, oral thiamine 100 mg thrice daily can be continued for prolonged periods.[6],[40] A similar treatment regimen is advocated for alcoholic cerebellar degeneration as well. Doses more than 500 mg intramuscular or intravenous three times a day for 3–5 days, followed by 250 mg once daily for a further 3–5 days is also recommended by some guidelines (e.g., British Association for Psychopharmacology).[44]Other effects of thiamineThere are some data to suggest that thiamine deficiency can modulate alcohol consumption and may result in pathological drinking.

Benfotiamine 600 mg/day as compared to placebo for 6 months was well tolerated and found to decrease psychiatric distress in males and reduce alcohol consumption in females with severe alcohol dependence.[45],[46] Other Factors During Thiamine Therapy Correction of hypomagnesemiaMagnesium is a cofactor for many thiamine-dependent enzymes in carbohydrate metabolism. Patients may fail to respond to thiamine supplementation in the presence of hypomagnesemia.[47] Magnesium deficiency is common in chronic alcohol users and is seen in 30% of individuals.[48],[49] It can occur because of increased renal excretion of magnesium, poor intake, decreased absorption because of Vitamin D deficiency, the formation of undissociated magnesium soaps with free fatty acids.[48],[49]The usual adult dose is 35–50 mmol of magnesium sulfate added to 1 L isotonic (saline) given over 12–24 h.[6] The dose has to be titrated against plasma magnesium levels. It is recommended to reduce the dose in renal failure. Contraindications include patients with documented hypersensitivity and those with heart block, Addison's disease, myocardial damage, severe hepatitis, or hypophosphatemia. Do not administer intravenous magnesium unless hypomagnesemia is confirmed.[6]Other B-complex vitaminsMost patients with deficiency of thiamine will also have reduced levels of other B vitamins including niacin, pyridoxine, and cobalamin that require replenishment.

For patients admitted to the intensive care unit with symptoms that may mimic or mask Wernicke encephalopathy, based on the published literature, routine supplementation during the 1st day of admission includes 200–500 mg intravenous thiamine every 8 h, 64 mg/kg magnesium sulfate (≈4–5 g for most adult patients), and 400–1000 μg intravenous folate.[50] If alcoholic ketoacidosis is suspected, dextrose-containing fluids are recommended over normal saline.[50] Precautions to be Taken When Administering Parenteral Thiamine It is recommended to monitor for anaphylaxis and has appropriate facilities for resuscitation and for treating anaphylaxis readily available including adrenaline and corticosteroids. Anaphylaxis has been reported at the rate of approximately 4/1 million pairs of ampoules of Pabrinex (a pair of high potency vitamins available in the UK containing 500 mg of thiamine (1:250,000 I/V administrations).[40] Intramuscular thiamine is reported to have a lower incidence of anaphylactic reactions than intravenous administration.[40] The reaction has been attributed to nonspecific histamine release.[51] Administer intravenous thiamine slowly, preferably by slow infusion in 100 ml normal saline over 15–30 min. Conclusions Risk factors for thiamine deficiency should be assessed in chronic alcohol users. A high index of suspicion and a lower threshold to diagnose thiamine deficiency states including Wernicke encephalopathy is needed. Several other presentations such as cerebellar syndrome, MBS, polyneuropathy, and delirium tremens could be related to thiamine deficiency and should be treated with protocols similar to Wernicke encephalopathy.

High-dose thiamine is recommended for the treatment of suspected Wernicke encephalopathy and related conditions [Figure 1]. However, evidence in terms of randomized controlled trials is lacking, and the recommendations are based on small studies and anecdotal reports. Nevertheless, as all these conditions respond to thiamine supplementation, it is possible that these have overlapping pathophysiology and are better considered as Wernicke encephalopathy spectrum disorders.Figure 1. Thiamine recommendations for patients with alcohol use disorder. AHistory of alcohol use, but no clinical features of WE.

BNo clinical features of WE, but with risk factors such as complicated withdrawal (delirium, seizures). CClinical features of WE (ataxia, opthalmoplegia, global confusion)Click here to viewFinancial support and sponsorshipNil.Conflicts of interestThere are no conflicts of interest. References 1.Frank LL. Thiamin in clinical practice. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr 2015;39:503-20.

2.Thomson AD, Marshall EJ. The natural history and pathophysiology of Wernicke's Encephalopathy and Korsakoff's Psychosis. Alcohol Alcohol 2006;41:151-8. 3.Thomson AD, Guerrini I, Marshall EJ. Wernicke's encephalopathy.

Role of thiamine. Pract Gastroenterol 2009;33:21-30. 4.Isenberg-Grzeda E, Kutner HE, Nicolson SE. Wernicke-Korsakoff-syndrome. Under-recognized and under-treated.

Psychosomatics 2012;53:507-16. 5.Wood B, Currie J, Breen K. Wernicke's encephalopathy in a metropolitan hospital. A prospective study of incidence, characteristics and outcome. Med J Aust 1986;144:12-6.

6.Thomson AD, Cook CC, Touquet R, Henry JA, Royal College of Physicians, London. The Royal College of Physicians report on alcohol. Guidelines for managing Wernicke's encephalopathy in the accident and Emergency Department. Alcohol Alcohol 2002;37:513-21. 7.Harper C.

Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency and associated brain damage is still common throughout the world and prevention is simple and safe!. Eur J Neurol 2006;13:1078-82. 8.Harper CG, Giles M, Finlay-Jones R. Clinical signs in the Wernicke-Korsakoff complex. A retrospective analysis of 131 cases diagnosed at necropsy.

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1986;49:341-5. 9.Cook CC. Prevention and treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Alcohol Alcohol 2000;35:19-20. 10.Caine D, Halliday GM, Kril JJ, Harper CG.

Operational criteria for the classification of chronic alcoholics. Identification of Wernicke's encephalopathy. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1997;62:51-60. 11.Sullivan EV, Pfefferbaum A. Neuroimaging of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

Alcohol Alcohol 2009;44:155-65. 12.Jung YC, Chanraud S, Sullivan EV. Neuroimaging of Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's syndrome. Neuropsychol Rev 2012;22:170-80. 13.Pruckner N, Baumgartner J, Hinterbuchinger B, Glahn A, Vyssoki S, Vyssoki B.

Thiamine substitution in alcohol use disorder. A narrative review of medical guidelines. Eur Addict Res 2019;25:103-10. 14.Day E, Bentham PW, Callaghan R, Kuruvilla T, George S. Thiamine for prevention and treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome in people who abuse alcohol.

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None, Conflict of Interest. NoneDOI. 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_440_20 Figures [Figure 1].